ARTHUR EDESON

Born: 24 October 1891, New York City, N.Y., USA.

Died: 14 February 1970, Agoura Hills, Calif., USA.

Education: City College, New York City.

Career: Edeson was barely making a living as a portrait photographer in 1910 when he decided to try his hand at the movies. 'I went to the old Éclair Studio in Fort Lee, New Jersey, and applied for a job. While I was waiting in the outer office, a man came in and stabbed his finger around the crowded room, saying: "I'll take you - and you - and you. Come with me." I couldn't tell whether I was one of those selected, but I joined the group anyway. Once inside the mysterious recesses of the studio, I found I'd been hired - as an actor.' He never lost his interest in photography, however, and began to shoot portraits of his fellow actors. His photos caught the attention of doph John van den Broek [born in the Netherlands; died in 1918 (drowned while filming)], and when a cameraman fell ill, van den Broek suggested that Edeson fill in. 'In those times, flat lighting was the rule of the day,' Edeson wrote. 'However, I began to introduce some of the lighting ideas I had learned in my portrait work - a suggestion of modeling here, an artistically placed shadow there - and soon my efforts tended to show a softer, portrait-like quality on the motion-picture screen. This was so completely out of line with what was considered good cinematography in those days that I had to use my best salesmanship to convince everyone it was good camerawork.' When American Éclair was reorganized as the World Film Corporation, Edeson stayed on to become chief cinematographer for the star Clara Kimball Young, and when she left for California in 1917, Edeson followed. In 1920, Douglas Fairbanks saw 'For the Soul of Rafael', one of Edeson's films for Young, and signed the cinematographer for three of his biggest pictures: 'The Three Musketeers', 'Robin Hood' & 'The Thief of Bagdad'. At Fox, he shot the first all-outdoor 100% talkie, 'In Old Arizona' and the first Fox Grandeur 70mm film, 'The Big Trail'. He later worked at Universal and MGM and eventually settled in at Warner Bros., where he would remain until his retirement in 1949.

Was a charter member and president [1953-54] of the ASC.

Awards: 'Oscar' AA nom [1928/29] for 'In Old Arizona'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1929/30] for 'All Quiet on the Western Front'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1943; b&w] for 'Casablanca'.



While Arthur Edeson's career after 'Casablanca' was really just making programmers, for his overall work through four decades he has few peers. Up to 1930, the keynote is spectacle, from the fantasy worlds of Fairbanks to the corpse-strewn battlegrounds of 'All Quiet on the Western Front'. Progressing into the 30s, however, it becomes more and more difficult to detect an Edeson style, beyond the common denominator of the Warner Brothers 'look', if such a thing really existed. But the number of essential works which came to life in front of his camera is still pretty amazing. We'll never know how much he contributed to such films as 'Frankenstein' and 'The Maltese Falcon', but it's certain that, had it not been for Edeson, we would be viewing vintage American cinema from some different, probably inferior, angle. [Markku Salmi in 'Film Dope', #14, March 1978.]

·····

'Arthur Edeson's style is a perfect example of the approach and merger of two schools and aesthetics of world cinema. Like Hal Mohr, Arthur Miller, or Charles Rosher, Edeson was one of the master craftsmen of the old American school, whose principal work was on the side of realism, considered by most historians to represent the zenith of Hollywood photography. Edeson built on the influence of German Expressionism, brought to America by German cinematographers during the 1920s.

One of Edeson's great strengths was his ability to capture the spirit of large-scale scenarios: for 'Robin Hood' [1922], for instance, through the use of double exposures and glass shots, and, notably for the scenes in the castle's interior, through the use of natural light. In 'The Thief of Bagdad' [1923] his photography creates an atmosphere almost unreal, and bringing a fascination to Raoul Walsh's film.

In fact, in the late 1920s and early 1930s Walsh was the director to whose work Edeson was most linked. The realism of the photography of 'Me, Gangster' [1928] and 'In Old Arizona' [1929], the first sound film to be shot outside a studio, prepares for that of 'The Big Trail' [1930], the culminating collaboration of the two men. Filmed in the first wide-screen process [70mm], known as Fox Grandeur, this epic reveals Edeson's mastery of composition, using frame enlargement dramatically. 'The Big Trail' is both pictorial and documentary, with a spectacular use of space, sensitive to the archetypical sequences of the western, including a buffalo charge, an Indian attack, and a fantastic river crossing.

"The Big Trail" -

70mm [aspect ratio 2.10:1]

The visual drama of 'The Big Trail', based in part on epic realism, is counterpointed admirably in his work as cinematographer for James Whale. In 'Frankenstein' [1931], Edeson was seen to have assimilated and controlled the 'expressionist heritage', synthesizing it into an appropriate style - attaining a fantastic and mysterious realism without losing the mobility of the camera. 'Frankenstein' is a classic 'horror movie', above all owing to its visual conception which suggests the silent German film, due to its paradigmatic opening scene in which Frankenstein and his assistant watch a funeral, and to Edeson's camera angles and camera movement.

In the late 1930s and early 1940s Edeson worked for Warner Brothers within the parameters of the studio style, but utilizing his own below-eye-level shots and strong angular compositions, he was able to produce the sinister and threatening 'The Maltese Falcon' [1941] and the devastatingly romantic 'Casablanca' [1942]. This alone is enough for Edeson to merit a place of honor in American film. Without obsessively darkening the set, without a geometrical lighting leading to remote shadows, obscuring rather than suggesting, 'The Maltese Falcon' can be said to have invented a genre - the film noir - and to have highlighted a visage that Louise Brooks called 'the face of St. Bogart'.' [From article by M. S. Fonseca on the filmreference.com website.]

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Wide Film Cinematography - Some Comments on 70mm Camerawork from a Practical Cinematographer

By ARTHUR EDESON, A.S.C.

If anyone had, a few months ago, told me that I would not only be photographing a big picture on wide film, but also rabidly enthusiastic over its artistic possibilities, I would have thought him crazy. For I had the typical, conservative cameraman's attitude toward wide film: it might be all right as a novelty, but as a practical medium for serious artistic work it was impossible. I could think of too many technical and artistic flaws in it to ever think that it could gain a cameraman's favor. Everything - especially the new proportion of its picture - seemed absolutely wrong.

Since then, I have spent more than six months photographing the 70 millimeter version of Raoul Walsh's "The Big Trail." In this time I have shot hundreds of thousands of feet of Grandeur film, and the results have convinced me that I, and not the process, was wrong. And now that the production is completed, I know that I shall find it difficult, indeed, to return to the cramped proportions of our present-day standard film.

For 70 millimeter photography has given me an entirely new perspective. Instead of regarding things in the light of the old, cramped, Movietone frame, I now see them, photographically, as my eye naturally perceives them - in much the same proportions as the low, wide Grandeur frame.

Technically, 70mm cinematography is much the same as ordinary 35mm cinematography. The cameras are standard Mitchell cameras. The film is standard Eastman Type Two Panchromatic. The lenses are, in most respects, similar to standard lenses. It is in the lenses, however, that the chief technical difference is found, for any given lens will embrace a considerably wider angle of view on the 70mm film than on the smaller standard. Therefore, when, as in this present picture, two versions are to be shot, the 70 millimeter camera must use a lens of approximately double the focal length of the lens used to make a corresponding 35 mm. shot. Or, reversing the example, when the cameraman uses a lens of a given focal length, the standard cameraman must use a lens of approximately half that size to make his corresponding shot. The shortest focal-length lens that I used during the making of "The Big Trail" was 50 mm., although 40 mm. is claimed to be theoretically the absolute minimum useable. However, as this was actual production work, and not laboratory tests. I preferred to play safe, and never used anything below a fifty When I used a fifty on a shot, the standard cameraman would use a twenty-five to produce a corresponding shot on his smaller film; when his shot required a fifty, mine would demand a four inch, and so on. In this picture, though the majority of the scenes were duplicated shot for shot, in each size of film ,as nearly as was possible, the Grandeur version, being considered the most important, received the greater attention. So it was the requirements of the 70 millimeter cameras that dictated the lenses to be used, the set-ups, action, and all such matters.

The selection of lenses for 70 millimeter use is especially important. One of the chief photographic complaints against wide-film has been that there was only too often a marked falling off in definition at the extremities of the picture. The only cure for this is the use of lenses of the very highest quality - the very best of the best. Of course, any cameraman worthy of the name will take great pains in the selection of his lens equipment, but in selecting wide-film objectives, he must take even more extraordinary precautions. This naturally means an endless amount of testing before even one lens is chosen, but it is well worth it, for only the best lenses can give perfect Grandeur pictures, and only perfect pictures can reveal the full possibilities of 70 millimeter.

The chief requirements for lenses for wide-film cinematography are, first and foremost, extremely wide covering power; and secondly (and of quite as great importance), extremely great depth of focus. Due to the more natural shape of the Grandeur frame, there is a certain pseudo-stereoscopic effect produced: but this effect is lost unless there is a very considerable depth of focus in the image. The 70 millimeter picture is very nearly the same proportion as the natural field of our vision, which, I suppose, is responsible for this pseudostereoscopy. But, clearly, to take full advantage of this, we must use lenses which will give us a degree of depth at least somewhat approximating that of our eyes. Therefore, it is vital that Grandeur lenses be selected with a view toward getting this effect, so that the crispest, deepest pictures may be had

Another point which has been a source of trouble to the early users of wide film is its liability to abrasion. During the many months we were working on "The Big Trail," we shot more than half a million feet of 70 mm. alone, with absolute freedom from scratches or abrasions of any kind. This was done merely by exercising extreme care in the always important matter of keeping the cameras and magazines clean. It became a hard and fast rule that the cameras must be cleaned thoroughly every night, not only with brushes, but with compressed air streams.

Another troublesome detail for which we found a sure cure is that of film curling and buckling. A buckle in a 70 millimeter camera is a terrible thing, for it not only ruins a large quantity of valuable film, and often damages the camera, but it invariably makes the motor a total loss. During our first week's work on the picture, we had several bad buckles-which meant new motors every time. Naturally this was serious; it couldn't be allowed to continue. So we bent all our energies toward finding the cause of these buckles. Eventually we found it to be caused by friction between the edges of the film and the walls of the magazines. After that, we took special pains in loading, making sure that every roll of film used was absolutely true to its spool, with no chance of touching the walls of the magazine-and we had no more buckles during the picture.

Aside from these details, Grandeur cinematography is, from the technical viewpoint, no different from standard-size camerawork. Any man who is technically able to do good work on 35 mm. film should therefore be able to do just as well on wide film. In this connection, it is interesting to note that while on "The Big Trail," as we were constantly moving around the country during our extended location trip, neither Mr. Walsh nor myself was able to see any of the film which we shot until our return to Hollywood-nearly five months later That the film-more than 500,000 feet of Grandeur alone-was all technically perfect is not only a definite demonstration that wide-film cinematography is basically the same as 35 mm work, but a very high tribute to my associates who manned the other Grandeur cameras.

From the artistic viewpoint, the chief requirement of Grandeur cinematography is that both the cameraman and the director learn to accommodate themselves to the wider frame. The cameraman's problem is probably the easier, for he soon learns that composing a picture on the wide frame of the Grandeur camera is not, essentially, so different from composing for the old "silent standard" rectangle, and far easier than for the nearly square Movietone frame. The director, however, must in a Grandeur picture pay considerably more attention to his background action than is usually the case, for, even in close-ups, the depth of focus demanded by Grandeur makes the background an important part of the picture. Incidentally, Grandeur reduces the number of close-ups considerably, as the figures are so much larger that semi-close-ups are usually all that is needed.

In working on such a picture as "The Big Trail," 70 millimeter is a tremendously important aid for the epic sweep of the picture demands that it be painted against a great canvas. Grandeur gives us such a canvas to work with, and enables us to make the background play its part in the picture, just as it did in the historical events which we are dramatizing. And that is what we have tried to do throughout this picture: to make history live again upon the screen. The chief motif of the story is the indomitable perseverance of the pioneers, as shown in their pushing west across the great deserts, the vast plains, the towering mountains, and into the great forests of California and Oregon. The background thus plays a vitally important role in the picture-a role which can only be brought out completely by being shown as 70 millimeter film can show it. Lucien Andriot, who photographed the standard-film version of the picture, did a superb piece of work, but the medium with which he was working could not begin to capture the vast sweep of the story and its background as did the Grandeur. Working in 35 mm. film, he was simply unable to dramatize the backgrounds as did the larger film, for in 35 mm. he could not attempt to adequately show both the vast backgrounds and the intimate foreground action in a single shot as the Grandeur cameras can. The illustrations reproducing the identical scene as treated by both 35 mm. and Grandeur cameras shows this admirably.

From my experience with 70 millimeter cinematography on "The Big Trail," I can confidently say that the wider film s not only the coming medium for such great pictures, but that it will undoubtedly become the favored one for all types of picture. It marks a definite advance in motion picture technique, and from it will undoubtedly be evolved the truly stereoscopic picture of the future, toward which so many people have long been striving. As I have worked, so far, only with the 70 mm. film, I hardly feel qualified to prophesy as to the width which the industry will ultimately adopt as the standard, although I naturally lean toward the Grandeur, with which I am most accustomed. However, wider film is so definitely a desirable improvement that I hope that a definite standard will soon be accepted. Once that standard has been determined, the public will, if given suitable pictures on the wider film, undoubtedly show a decided preference for it. None the less, 35 mm. versions must continue to be made for a long time: but this will not be overly difficult, as reductions can be made from Grandeur negatives with perfect satisfaction, by optical printing, and at a far less expense than by shooting two versions, as has been done on all the wide-film pictures thus far made. This will, of course, impose upon the cameraman and director a necessity for unusually great care in making his composition: but it will hardly be more difficult than his present problem of composing 35 mm pictures so that they will be suitable for all of the many projection apertures in use throughout the world. The greatest difficulty here will be in composing his two-shots, which will have to be made so that they can be, in the reduction-print, made into two separate close-ups. But this difficulty is only a minor one when compared with the very great advantages which 70 millimeter cinematography offers in all other respects. And when these advantages, and those which the wide film soundtrack offers the sound-engineers, are combined with a perfected system of color cinematography, cinematographers and directors will indeed have a medium which is worthy of their best artistic and technical efforts. [Published in American Cinematographer - September, 1930]



 FILMS [1 reel = c. 10m]

1914

The Dollar Mark [Oscar A.C. Lund] b&w; 5 reels; prod William A. Brady Picture Plays, Inc. (WBPP)

1914

A Gentleman From Mississippi [George Sargent] b&w; 5 reels; prod WBPP

1914

The Deep Purple [James Young] b&w; 5 reels; prod World Film Corporation (WFC)

1915

Hearts in Exile [James Young] b&w; 5 reels; re-issued in 1917 as 'Hearts Afire'; prod WFC

1915

The Master Hand [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; + asst dir; prod Premo Feature Film Corporation (PFFC)

1916

The Devil's Toy [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; prod PFFC

1916

His Brother's Wife [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; prod PFFC

1916

Miss Petticoats [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; prod WFC

1916

The Gilded Cage/The Heart of a Princess [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; prod WFC

1916

Bought and Paid For/The Faun [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; prod WBPP

1916

A Woman Alone/Loneliness [Harry Davenport] b&w; 5 reels; prod WFC

1916

A Square Deal [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; prod WFC

1917

The Social Leper [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; prod WFC

1917

The Page Mystery [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; prod WFC

1917

In Again - Out Again [John Emerson] b&w; 5 reels; or ph Victor Fleming; prod Douglas Fairbanks Pictures Corporation (DFPC)

1917

The Stolen Paradise [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; prod WFC

1917

The Price of Pride [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; prod WFC

1917

Wild and Woolly [John Emerson] b&w; 5 reels; or ph Victor Fleming (superv) & Harry Thorpe; prod DFPC

1917

Souls Adrift/Chasms [Harley Knoles] b&w; 5 reels; prod WFC

1917

Baby Mine [John S. Robertson & Hugo Ballin] b&w; 6 reels; prod Goldwyn Pictures Corporation (GPC)

1917

Reaching for the Moon [John Emerson] b&w; 5 reels; cph: Victor Fleming; other sources credit Fleming, Sam Landers & Harry Thorpe as doph; prod DFPC

1917

Nearly Married [Chester Withey] b&w; 5 reels; prod GPC

1918

Jack Spurlock, Prodigal [Carl Harbaugh] b&w; 6 reels; prod Fox Film Corporation

1918

The Savage Woman [Edmund Mortimer & (uncred - started film) Robert G. Vignola] b&w; 5 reels; prod Clara Kimball Young Film Corporation (CKY)

1918

The Road Through the Dark [Edmund Mortimer] b&w; 5 reels; prod CKY

1918

The Hushed Hour [Edmund Mortimer] b&w; 5 reels; prod Harry Garson Prods (HGP)

1918

Cheating Cheaters [Allan Dwan] b&w; 5 reels; prod CKY

1919

The Better Wife [William Earle] b&w; 5 reels; prod CKY

1919

Eyes of Youth [Albert Parker] b&w; prod Garson Prods

1920

The Forbidden Woman [Harry Garson] b&w; 6 reels; prod Garson Studios, Inc.

1920

For the Soul of Rafael [Harry Garson] b&w; prod Garson Studios, Inc. (GSI)

1920

Mid-Channel [Harry Garson] b&w; 6 reels; prod GSI

1920

Hush [Harry Garson] b&w; 6 reels; prod Equity Pictures

1921

Good Women [Louis J. Gasnier] b&w; prod Robertson-Cole Pictures

1921

The Three Musketeers [Fred Niblo] b&w with color seq; prod Douglas Fairbanks Pictures Corporation (DFPC)

1922

The Worldly Madonna [Harry Garson] b&w; 6 reels; prod HGP

1922

[Douglas Fairbanks in] Robin Hood [Allan Dwan] b&w; uncred cph: Charles Richardson; trick ph: Paul Eagler; prod DFPC

1922

The End of the World [Harvey Matherson] b&w; prod ?

1923

The Thief of Bagdad [Raoul Walsh] b&w; prod DFPC

1924

Inez from Hollywood/The Good Bad Girl [Alfred E. Green] b&w; prod Sam E. Rork Prods

1924

The Lost World [Harry O. Hoyt] b&w + hand-colored & tinted seq; addph: Homer Scott & J. Devereaux Jennings; tech dir: Willis H. O'Brien; sfx ph: Ralph Hammeras, Hans Koenekamp & Vernon L. Walker; prod First National Pictures (FN)

1925

Waking Up the Town [James Cruze] b&w; 6 reels; cph: Paul Perry; prod Mary Pickford Company

Next to dir John Francis Dillon [hat]

1925

One Way Street [John Francis Dillon] b&w; 6 reels; prod FN

1925

The Talker [Alfred E. Green] b&w; prod FN

1925

Her Sister from Paris [Sidney Franklin] b&w; prod Joseph M. Schenck Prods

1925

Stella Dallas [Henry King] b&w; prod Samuel Goldwyn, Inc. (SGI)

1926

Partners Again [Henry King] b&w; 6 reels; prod SGI

1926

The Bat [Roland West] b&w; cph: Gregg Toland; prod Feature Prods

1926

Sweet Daddies [Alfred Santell] b&w; prod FN

1926

Subway Sadie [Alfred Santell] b&w; prod Al Rockett Prods (ARP)

1926

The Blue Eagle [John Ford] b&w; 6 reels; uncred cph; ph: George Schneiderman; prod Fox Film Corporation (FFC)

1926

Just Another Blonde/The Girl from Coney Island [Alfred Santell] b&w; 6 reels; prod ARP

1927

McFadden's Flats [Richard Wallace] b&w; prod FN

1927

The Patent Leather Kid [Alfred Santell] b&w; cph: Alvin Knechtel & Ralph Hammeras; prod FN

1927

The Drop Kick/Glitter [Millard Webb] b&w; 7 reels; cph: Alvin Knechtel; prod FN

1927

The Gorilla [Alfred Santell] b&w; prod FN

1928

A Thief in the Dark [Albert Ray] b&w; 6 reels; prod FFC

1928

Me, Gangster [Raoul Walsh] b&w; silent (with sound seq); prod FFC

1929

In Old Arizona [Irving Cummings (replaced Raoul Walsh)] b&w; cph: Alfred Hansen; prod FFC; the first 'talkie' shot outdoors

1929

Girls Gone Wild [Lewis Seiler] b&w; 6 reels; cph: Irving Rosenberg; silent (with sound seq) & sound versions; prod FFC

1929

The Cock-Eyed World [Raoul Walsh] b&w; sound & silent versions; prod FFC

1929

Romance of the Rio Grande [Alfred Santell] b&w; sound & silent versions; prod FFC

1929

All Quiet on the Western Front [Lewis Milestone & (dial dir) George Cukor] b&w; 14 reels (re-issue 1939: 10 reels); uncred ph final 'Butterfly' seq: Karl Freund; sfx ph: Frank H. Booth; sound & silent (with synchronized music) versions; prod Universal Pictures Corporation

1930

The Big Trail [Raoul Walsh] Fox Grandeur (70mm) & 35mm/b&w; ph Grandeur version; ph 35mm version: Lucien Andriot; also German-language version 'Die große Fahrt/Der große Treck'

1930

The Man Who Came Back [Raoul Walsh] b&w

1930

Doctors' Wives [Frank Borzage] b&w

1931

Always Goodbye [Kenneth MacKenna & William Cameron Menzies] b&w; 60m

1931

Waterloo Bridge [James Whale] b&w

1931

Frankenstein [James Whale] b&w; uncred cph: Paul Ivano; originally scheduled with dir Robert Florey and ph Karl Freund

1932

The Impatient Maiden [James Whale] b&w

1932

Strangers of the Evening/The Hidden Corpse/Case of the Missing Corpse [H. Bruce Humberstone] b&w

1932

Fast Companions [Kurt Neumann] b&w

1932

The Old Dark House [James Whale] b&w

1932

The Last Mile [Sam Bischoff] b&w

1932

Those We Love [Robert Florey] b&w

1932

Red Dust [Victor Fleming] b&w; uncred cph (?); ph: Harold Rosson

1932

Flesh [John Ford] b&w

1933

The Constant Woman/Auction in Souls/Hell in a Circus [Victor Schertzinger] b&w

1933

A Study in Scarlet [Edwin L. Marin] b&w

1933

The Life of Jimmy Dolan/The Kid's Last Fight [Archie Mayo] b&w

1933

The Big Brain/Enemies of Society [George Archainbaud] b&w

1933

The Invisible Man [James Whale] b&w; miniature & addph: John J. Mescall; sfx: John P. Fulton

1933

His Double Life [Arthur Hopkins; (assoc dir) William C. de Mille & Joe Nadel] b&w; 63m

1933

Palooka/The Great Schnozzle [Benjamin Stoloff] b&w

1934

The Merry Frinks/Happy Family [Alfred E. Green] b&w

1934

Here Comes the Navy [Lloyd Bacon] b&w

1934 

Maybe It's Love [William McGann] b&w; 63m

1934

Devil Dogs of the Air [Lloyd Bacon] b&w

1934

While the Patient Slept [Ray Enright] b&w

1935

Dinky [D. Ross Lederman & Howard Bretherton] b&w; 65m

1935

Going Highbrow [Robert Florey] b&w; 68m; cph: William Rees

1935

Mutiny on the Bounty [Frank Lloyd] b&w; uncred cph: Charles G. Clarke (Tahiti loc) & Sidney Wagner

1935

Ceiling Zero [Howard Hawks] b&w

1935

Satan Met a Lady [William Dieterle] b&w

1936

The Golden Arrow [Alfred E. Green] b&w

1936

Hot Money [William McGann] b&w; 68m

1936

China Clipper [Ray Enright] b&w; aph: Elmer Dyer & Hans F. Koenekamp; spec pfx: Fred Jackman

1936

Gold Diggers of 1937 [Lloyd Bacon & Busby Berkeley (mus numbers)] b&w

1936

The Kid Comes Back/Don't Pull Your Punches [B. Reeves Eason] b&w; 60m

1936

The Go Getter [Busby Berkeley] b&w

1937

Mr. Dodd Takes the Air [Alfred E. Green] b&w

1937

The Footloose Heiress [William Clemens] b&w; 59m

1937

They Won't Forget [Mervyn LeRoy] b&w

1937

Submarine D-1 [Lloyd Bacon] b&w

1937

Swing Your Lady [Ray Enright & Bobby Connolly (mus numbers)] b&w

1938

Cowboy from Brooklyn/Romance and Rhythm [Lloyd Bacon] b&w

1938

Mr. Chump/Mister Chump [William Clemens] b&w; 60m

1938

Racket Busters [Lloyd Bacon] b&w

1938

Wings of the Navy [Lloyd Bacon] b&w; aph: Elmer Dyer & Paul Mantz; sfx ph: H.F. Koenekamp & Byron Haskin

1938

Nancy Drew... Reporter [William Clemens] b&w; 65m

1938

Secret Service of the Air [Noel Smith] b&w; 61m; uncred cph; ph: Ted McCord; film #1 in 4-part 'Secret Service'-series (Warner Bros., 1939-40)

1938

Sweepstakes Winner [William McGann] b&w; 59m

1939

Each Dawn I Die/Killer Meets Killer [William Keighley] b&w

1939

No Place to Go [Terry O. Morse] b&w; 56m

1939

Kid Nightingale [George Amy] b&w; 57m

1939

Castle on the Hudson/Years Without Days [Anatole Litvak] b&w; sfx ph: Byron Haskin & Edwin DuPar

1940

They Drive by Night/The Road to Frisco [Raoul Walsh] b&w

1940

Tugboat Annie Sails Again [Lewis Seiler] b&w

1940

Lady with Red Hair [Kurt (Curtis) Bernhardt] b&w

1940

[May We Suggest] Kisses for Breakfast [Lewis Seiler] b&w

1941

[The Heroic Story of] Sergeant York [Howard Hawks & (uncred add) Vincent Sherman] b&w; ph battle seq (dir by B. Reeves Eason); ph: Sol Polito

1941

The Maltese Falcon [John Huston] b&w

1941

The Male Animal [Elliott Nugent] b&w

1941

Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra [Jean Negulesco] b&w; mus short/9m; ep series 'Melody Masters'

1942

Across the Pacific [John Huston, (final scenes) Vincent Sherman & (retakes) Jo Graham] b&w; sfx ph: Byron Haskin & Willard Van Enger; montages: Don Siegel

1942

Casablanca [Michael Curtiz] b&w; sfx ph: Lawrence Butler (dir) & Willard Van Enger; montages: Don Siegel & James Leicester

1942

Thank Your Lucky Stars [David Butler] b&w; sfx ph: H.F. Koenekamp

1943

Old Acquaintance [Vincent Sherman] b&w; uncred cph (last 3 days of shooting); ph: Sol Polito

1943

Shine on Harvest Moon [David Butler] b&w-c; sfx ph: Edwin DuPar

1943

The Mask of Dimitrios [Jean Negulesco] b&w

1944

The Conspirators [Jean Negulesco] b&w

1944

Nobody Lives FOREVER [Jean Negulesco] b&w; sfx ph: William McGann & Willard Van Enger

1945

Three Strangers [Jean Negulesco] b&w; sfx ph: Edwin DuPar

1945

The Time, the Place and the Girl [David Butler] c; cph: William V. Skall

1945

Never Say Goodbye [James V. Kern] b&w

1945

Two Guys from Milwaukee/Royal Flush [David Butler] b&w; sfx ph: Harry Barndollar & Edwin DuPar

1946

Stallion Road [James V. Kern & (uncred) Raoul Walsh] b&w

1946

My Wild Irish Rose [David Butler] c; cph: William V. Skall; sfx ph: Robert Burks

1947

Two Guys from Texas/Two Texas Knights [David Butler] c; cph: William V. Skall

1948

The Fighting O'Flynn/The O'Flynn [Arthur Pierson] b&w; spph: David S. Horsley