GREAT CINEMATOGRAPHERS


#3: B. Glennon - James Wong Howe [2nd cam] - Cy Clegg [asst dir] - "Burning Sands" [1922]

 

   


BERT GLENNON

 

Born: 19 November 1893, Anaconda, Montana, USA, as Herbert Lawrence Glennon.

Died: 29 June 1967, Sherman Oaks, Calif., USA.

Education: Stanford University.

Career: While attending university in 1912, he was hired as a c.asst, and upon graduation went into the film business full-time. Worked for the Keystone Film Company, the Famous Players Film Company and the William H. Clune Film Corporation [as laboratory superintendent]. In 1920, he went to Australia to work for Snowy Baker Productions. In 1928, he embarked on a career as director, but the few films he directed from 1928 to 1932 were increasingly mediocre. He resumed his cinematography career. Retired in 1963.

Was a member of the ASC since 1924.

His son James [1942-2006] was a doph.

Appeared in 'The March of Time Volume IX, Issue 10: Show Business at War' [1943].

Awards: 'Oscar' AA nom [1939; color; shared] for 'Drums Along the Mohawk'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1939; b&w] for 'Stagecoach'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1941; color] for 'Dive Bomber'.



GO TO FILMS

'The camera is the pen of our craft,' stated Josef von Sternberg. Though Bert Glennon is, typically, not mentioned in his autobiography, and though Lucien Ballard has cast some doubt on the validity of the official photography credits on the Sternberg films, I still choose to believe that Glennon was his most talented scribe. And even if you exclude 'Underworld', 'The Last Command' and 'Blonde Venus' from his list, it remains mightily impressive. In February 1930, at a time when he was engaged in his ultimately abortive directorial interlude, Glennon quoted the following as part of his cinematographical philosophy: 'I remember telling a friend of mine who asked for a formula by which to test cameramen - if a man comes to you and you don't know how good he is, have him make you a test shot of two people, cutting them off at the knees. Almost any good cameraman can make an attractive long shot or close-up, but it takes a real artist to make a beautiful two-shot.' The same article [in American Cinematographer] goes on to criticize the excessive lighting ['Most modern sets are grossly overlit.'] prevalent at the time, making it clear that Glennon was one of those artists for whom less is more. [Markku Salmi in 'Film Dope', No. 19, December 1979.]


Bert Glennon was a visual stylist whose cinematography enhanced the best work of such disparate directors as John Ford and Josef von Sternberg. Glennon exemplifies the professional Hollywood craftsperson overshadowed by volatile, individualistic directors, his name rarely mentioned in film histories.

There were two Glennon styles - the glossy soft-focus of his 1920s Paramounts, and the dramatic, often minimalist, realism he employed at 20th Century-Fox in the late 1930s and at Warners ten years later. Along with Victor Milner, Glennon helped define the corporate Paramount look, with assignments for such directors as Cecil B. DeMille, Malcolm St. Clair, Rowland V. Lee, and Mauritz Stiller.

Glennon's two great silent triumphs were 'The Ten Commandments' and 'Underworld'. The DeMille epic was the most spectacular production up to that time. The contemporary story is well handled, but the film is most satisfying in the Biblical sequences, many shot in reverential tableaux, with sweeping camera movements on the action scenes. A prologue of the Israelites fleeing Egypt was co-photographed in two-strip Technicolor with Ray Rennahan.

'Underworld' foreshadowed many later crime films, uniting elements of that genre which would become commonplace, including Glennon's chiaroscuro photography. There are many fine photographic touches - the underworld ball, the police car chase - rendered in a crisp, economic manner. 'Underworld' was a much more starkly lit work than was common at Paramount, but in his next film for von Sternberg, 'The Last Command', Glennon reverted to the softer studio style. His mobile camera makes both 'Underworld' and 'The Last Command' among the most visually pleasing films of the late silent era.

Glennon directed nine programmers between 1928 and 1931. He returned to cinematography in 1932 with von Sternberg's 'Blonde Venus', shooting interiors [Paul Ivano handled the exteriors]. Among the scenes Glennon worked on is the "Hot Voodoo" number, with icon Marlene Dietrich emerging from a gorilla suit.

Glennon reunited with von Sternberg on 'The Scarlet Empress', which cast Dietrich as Russia's Catherine the Great. Glennon achieved an extraordinary Baroque look, with dazzling camera movement complemented by von Sternberg's eccentric mise en scène and lavish art direction by Hans Dreier. Truly one of the most photographically stunning works in American cinema, 'The Scarlet Empress' was a Glennon masterwork, culminating his contributions to the von Sternberg canon. Typically, the director made no mention of Bert Glennon in his autobiography.

Glennon moved to Fox in 1934, and inexplicably toiled on B-movies. His fortunes improved when Darryl Zanuck merged his 20th Century Pictures with the failing Fox and assigned him to shoot 'The Prisoner of Shark Island' [1935], the first of eight John Ford films shot by Glennon. The story of Dr. Samuel Mudd, the man who treated John Wilkes Booth's wound after the Lincoln assassination and found himself incarcerated as an unwitting accomplice, the film reveals Ford's passion for the era, nicely realized by Glennon. The Shark Island prison sequences are dark and gloomy, contrasted with the juleps-and-magnolia South symbolized by Mudd's family. Like much of Ford's best work, there is a silent film-feel to the cinematography.

Glennon's position as a master cinematographer was confirmed with the 1938-39 Ford films. 'Stagecoach' deserves its reputation as one of the great westerns. Picturesque Monument Valley vistas and expert action sequences were expertly captured by Glennon, making 'Stagecoach' one of the best looking black-and-white movies ever made. In a direct stylistic contrast to the von Sternberg films, there is little camera movement, and rare use of close-ups, the notable exception being the Indians on the bluff in a pre-attack sequence.

Smaller in scope, 'Young Mr. Lincoln' impeccably recreated Indiana and Illinois of the 1830s and 1840s. While an uncredited Arthur C. Miller shot the riverside locations, Glennon was responsible for the bulk of the film's classical look, with the fight in the clearing particularly well rendered. 'Drums Along the Mohawk' was a much more difficult film. Forced by Zanuck's release schedule to rush from 'Young Mr. Lincoln' to 'Drums Along the Mohawk', the filmmakers were plagued by minimal preparation, an unpolished script, and a rugged location in Utah's Wasatch Mountains. Summer storms played havoc with matching shots, and to compound problems, the film was shot in three-strip Technicolor, Ford's first in color. Despite these rigors, 'Drums Along the Mohawk' is exquisitely photographed, as perfect an exercise in color as 'Stagecoach' was for black-and-white.

It was ten years before Glennon worked with Ford again, but the occasion and the project was a special one - 'Wagon Master'. Ford told Peter Bogdanovich that 'Wagon Master' was one of the films that "came closest to being what I had wanted to achieve." A western masterwork, the film is graced by Glennon's newsreel quality cinematography.

Glennon did superlative work for another strong director, Raoul Walsh, on 'They Died with Their Boots On', in which he photographed a spectacular recreation of Custer's Last Stand; and 'Desperate Journey', a slam-bang Second World War adventure highlighted by an exhilarating car chase. Glennon closed his career at Warners with some of the best 3-D photography ['House of Wax', 'The Moonlighter', 'The Mad Magician']. [From article by John A. Gallagher on the Film Reference website.]


 

 FILMS [1 reel = c. 10m]

1915

Stingaree [James W. Horne] b&w; 12-part serial; prod Kalem Company

1916

Ramona [Donald Crisp] b&w; 10-14 reels; cph: Enrico (Enrique) Vallejo; prod Clune Film Producing Company

1916

The Eyes of the World [Donald Crisp] b&w; 7-10 reels; cph: Enrico (Enrique) Vallejo; prod Clune Film Producing Company

1919

Lightning Bryce [Paul C. Hurst] b&w; 15-part serial; prod National Film Corporation of America (NFCA)

1920

The Heart of Sonya [?] b&w; prod ?

1920

Parted Curtains [Bertram Bracken & James C. Bradford] b&w; 6 reels; or ph Walter L. Griffin; prod NFCA

1920

The Kentucky Colonel [William A. Seiter] b&w; 6 reels; cph: Allen M. Davey; prod NFCA

1920

The Society Bug [Ward Hayes] b&w; 2 reels; prod NFCA

1920

The Torrent [Stuart Paton] b&w; 5 reels; cph: Roland Price; prod Universal Film Manufacturing Company (UFMC)

1921

The Dangerous Moment [Marcel De Sano] b&w; 5 reels; prod UFMC

1921

Cheated Love [King Baggot] b&w; 5 reels; prod UFMC

1921

The Kiss/Little Erolinda [Jack Conway] b&w; 5 reels; prod UFMC

1921

A Daughter of the Law [Jack Conway] b&w; 5 reels; prod UFMC

1921

Moonlight Follies/The Butterfly [King Baggot] b&w; 5 reels; prod UFMC

1921

Nobody's Fool [King Baggot] b&w; 5 reels; prod UFMC

1922

Moran of the Lady Letty [George Melford] b&w; 7 reels & 68m (2006 alternate version with a mus score); co-2nd cam; ph: William Marshall; prod Famous Players-Lasky Corporation (FPLC)

1922

The Woman Who Walked Alone [George Melford] b&w; 6 reels; prod FPLC

1922

Burning Sands/The Dweller in the Desert [George Melford] b&w; 7 reels; 2nd cam: James Wong Howe; prod FPLC

1922

Ebb Tide [George Melford] b&w; 8 reels; 2nd cam: James Wong Howe (took over 1st cam for a few days while B. Glennon was ill); prod FPLC

1922

Java Head [George Melford] b&w; 8 reels; prod FPLC

1923

You Can't Fool Your Wife [George Melford] b&w; 6 reels; prod FPLC

1923

Salomy Jane/The Law of the Sierras [George Melford] sometimes cred as ph, but prod was ph by Charles G. Clarke

1923

The Ten Commandments [Cecil B. DeMille] b&w + color seq (the Exodus); 14 reels; cph: Ray Rennahan (color seq), J. Peverell Marley, Archie Stout, J.F. 'Fred' Westerberg, Edward S. Curtis & Donald Biddle Keyes; visual efx & tech dir: Roy Pomeroy; filmed May-August; prod FPLC

1924

Triumph [Cecil B. DeMille] b&w; 8 reels; prod FPLC

1924

Changing Husbands [Frank Urson & Paul Iribe] b&w; 7 reels; prod FPLC

1924

Open All Night/One Parisian "Knight" [Paul Bern] b&w; 6 reels; prod FPLC

1924

Worldly Goods [Paul Bern] b&w; 6 reels; prod FPLC

1924

Tomorrow's Love [Paul Bern] b&w; 6 reels; prod FPLC

1925

The Dressmaker From Paris [Paul Bern] b&w; 8 reels; prod FPLC

1925

Are Parents People? [Malcolm St. Clair] b&w; 7 reels; prod FPLC

1925

Grounds for Divorce [Paul Bern] b&w; 6 reels; prod FPLC

1925

Wild Horse Mesa [George B. Seitz] b&w; 8 reels; prod FPLC

1925

Flower of Night [Paul Bern] b&w; 7 reels; prod FPLC

1925

A Woman of the World [Malcolm St. Clair] b&w; 7 reels; prod FPLC

1926

The Crown of Lies [Dimitri Buchowetzki] b&w; 5 reels; prod FPLC

1926

Good and Naughty [Malcolm St. Clair] b&w; 6 reels; prod FPLC

1926

Hotel Imperial [Mauritz Stiller] b&w; 8 reels; prod delayed midway for a couple of months due to the death of Rudolph Valentino; prod FPLC

1926

Old Ironsides/Sons of the Sea [James Cruze] b&w (2 seq shot in Magnascope); uncred co-addph; ph: Alfred Gilks; silent (12 reels) & sound (1928; 8 reels) versions; prod Paramount Famous-Lasky Corporation (PFLC)

1927

Barbed Wire [Rowland V. Lee (replaced Mauritz Stiller, who started the film)] b&w; 7 reels; prod PFLC

 

 

1927

Underworld/Paying the Penalty [Josef von Sternberg (replaced Arthur Rosson)] b&w; 8 reels; prod PFLC

1927

We're All Gamblers [James Cruze] b&w; 7 reels; prod PFLC

1927

The Woman On Trial [Mauritz Stiller] b&w; 6 reels; prod PFLC

1927

The Street of Sin/King of Soho [Mauritz Stiller (started film), Lothar Mendes (replaced M. Stiller) & Ludwig Berger (finished film)] b&w; 7 reels; cph Harry Fischbeck & Victor Milner; prod PFLC

1927

The City Gone Wild [James Cruze] b&w; 6 reels; prod PFLC

 

 

1927

The Last Command/The General [Josef von Sternberg] b&w; 9 reels; prod PFLC

1928

The Patriot [Ernst Lubitsch] b&w; 12 reels; silent & sound version; prod PFLC

1932

Blonde Venus [Josef von Sternberg] b&w; uncred addph (ext): Paul Ivano

1932

The Half Naked Truth [Gregory La Cava] b&w

1932

Christopher Strong [Dorothy Arzner] b&w; sfx: Vernon Walker; transitions: Slavko Vorkapich

1933

Gabriel Over the White House [Gregory La Cava] b&w

1933

Melody Cruise [Mark Sandrich] b&w; sfx: Vernon Walker, Linwood Dunn, Cecil Love (assoc) & Clifford Stine (assoc)

1933

Morning Glory [Lowell Sherman] b&w; addph: Henry Gerrard

1933

So This Is Harris! [Mark Sandrich] b&w; short/28m

1933

The Bowery [Raoul Walsh] b&w; uncred cam; ph: Barney McGill

1933

Alice in Wonderland [Norman Z. McLeod] b&w; anim + live action; cph: Henry Sharp; tech efx: Gordon Jennings & Farciot Edouart

1933

The Scarlet Empress [Josef von Sternberg] b&w

1934

Grand Canary [Irving Cummings] b&w

1934

She Was a Lady [Hamilton MacFadden] b&w

1934

Hell in the Heavens [John G. Blystone] b&w

1934

The Lottery Lover [Wilhelm (William) Thiele] b&w

1935

Under the Pampas Moon [James Tinling] b&w; uncred backgrounds ph; ph: Chester A. Lyons

1935

Ginger [Lewis Seiler] b&w

1935

Thunder in the Night [George Archainbaud] b&w; 67m

1935

Bad Boy [John G. Blystone] b&w; 56m

1935

Show Them No Mercy!/Tainted Money [George Marshall] b&w

1935

The Prisoner of Shark Island [John Ford] b&w

1936

Little Miss Nobody [John G. Blystone] b&w; 65m

1936

Half Angel [Sidney Lanfield] b&w; 65m

1936

Dimples [William A. Seiter] b&w

1936

Can This Be Dixie? [George Marshall] b&w; 68m; cph: Ernest Palmer

1936

Lloyd's of London [Henry King] b&w

1937

The Prisoner of Zenda [John Cromwell; (uncred) George Cukor (add scenes) & W.S. Van Dyke (fencing seq)] b&w; uncred cph; ph: James Wong Howe; sfx: Jack Cosgrove, John M. Nickolaus & Harry Redmond Jr.

1937

The Hurricane [John Ford & (assoc) Stuart Heisler] b&w; South Seas ph (Winter 1936): Archie Stout & Paul Eagler; spec pfx: Ray Binger

1937

The Adventures of Marco Polo [Archie Mayo (replaced John Cromwell after a few days); (uncred action seq) John Ford] b&w (tinted & toned); 2uc (+ co-2ud); ph: Rudolph Maté & Archie Stout

1937

Swiss Miss [John G. Blystone; (uncred) Hal Roach (fill-in) & S.S. Van Keuren (add scenes in April 1938)] b&w; uncred 2uc (+ some 1st unit ph); ph: Norbert Brodine & Art Lloyd; pfx: Roy Seawright

1938

Kidnapped [Alfred L. Werker (replaced Otto Preminger in 2nd week of filming)] b&w; uncred cph (?); ph: Gregg Toland

 

#1: [Center] with dir John Ford [seated] - "Stagecoach"

#2: [Left] with dir John Ford

 

1938

Stagecoach [John Ford] b&w; spec pfx: Ray Binger

1939

Young Mr. Lincoln [John Ford] b&w; uncred cph: Arthur Miller

1939

The Rains Came [Clarence Brown] b&w; uncred cph (started film, but fell ill; replaced by A. Miller); ph: Arthur Miller

1939

Second Fiddle [Sidney Lanfield (replaced William A. Seiter)] b&w; uncred ph add scenes; ph: Leon Shamroy

1939

Winter Carnival [Charles F. Reisner] b&w; uncred ph ice carnival seq; ph: Merritt Gerstad

1939

Drums Along the Mohawk [John Ford] c; cph: Ray Rennahan

1939

Swanee River/The Life of Stephen Foster [Sidney Lanfield] c

1940

Our Town [Sam Wood] b&w; spec pfx: Jack Cosgrove

1940

The Howards of Virginia/The Tree of Liberty [Frank Lloyd] b&w; montages: Slavko Vorkapich

1940

Down Argentine Way [Irving Cummings] c; uncred 2uc; ph: Leon Shamroy & Ray Rennahan

1940

Virginia [Edward H. Griffith] c; cph: William V. Skall; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1940

The Reluctant Dragon/A Day at Disneys/Behind the Scenes at Walt Disney Studio/A Day at the Studio (20m excerpt) [Alfred L. Werker (live action)] b&w-c; anim + live action; b&w live action ph; Technicolor live action ph: Winton C. Hoch

1940

One Night in Lisbon [Edward H. Griffith] b&w

1941

Dive Bomber [Michael Curtiz] c; cph: Winton C. Hoch; aph: Elmer Dyer; sfx ph: Byron Haskin & Rex Wimpy

1941

The Tanks Are Coming [B. Reeves Eason] c; short/20m

1941

They Died with Their Boots On [Raoul Walsh] b&w

1941

Juke Girl [Curtis Bernhardt] b&w

1942

Desperate Journey [Raoul Walsh] b&w; sfx: Edwin DuPar, Byron Haskin & Nathan Levinson

1942

The Desert Song [Robert Florey] c; sfx: Lawrence Butler & Edwin DuPar; filmed June-August, released December 1943 (release was delayed because of wartime restrictions)

1942

Mission to Moscow [- The Former U.S. Ambassador Joseph E. Davies' Mission to Moscow] [Michael Curtiz] b&w; sfx: Roy Davidson & H.F. Koenekamp; montages: Don Siegel & James Leicester

1943

Ozzie Nelson and His Orchestra #2 [Jean Negulesco] b&w; mus short/9m

1943

This Is the Army [Michael Curtiz] c; cph: Sol Polito; spec pfx: Jack Cosgrove; montages: James Leicester & Don Siegel

1943

One More Tomorrow [Peter Godfrey (replaced Irving Rapper)] b&w; filmed April-June & October-November; released in 1946

1943

[Edna Ferber's] Saratoga Trunk [Sam Wood] b&w; uncred fill-in ph (while E. Haller was ill); ph: Ernest Haller; filmed February-June; released in 1946

1943

In Our Time [Vincent Sherman] b&w; uncred cph; ph: Carl Guthrie; sfx: Robert Burks; montages: James Leicester

1943

Destination Tokyo [Delmer Daves] b&w; sfx: Willard Van Enger & Lawrence Butler (dir); filmed June-September

1944

The Very Thought of You [Delmer Daves] b&w

1944

Hollywood Canteen [Delmer Daves] b&w

1944

San Antonio [David Butler; (uncred) Robert Florey & Raoul Walsh] c; uncred cph: William V. Skall; sfx: Willard Van Enger

1945

Shadow of a Woman [Joseph Santley] b&w; sfx: Edwin DuPar & Harry Barndollar

1945

Night and Day [Michael Curtiz] c; uncred cph; ph: Peverell Marley (replaced B. Glennon after 2 weeks) & William V. Skall

1946

The Red House/No Trespassing [Delmer Daves] b&w

1946

Mr. District Attorney/District Attorney [Robert B. Sinclair] b&w

1946

Copacabana [Alfred E. Green] b&w; spec pfx: John P. Fulton

1947

Ruthless [Edgar G. Ulmer] b&w

1948

The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad [Jack Kinney, James Algar & Clyde Geronimi] c; anim (+ live action)/68m; live action ph; live action seq cut from film

1949

Red Light [Roy Del Ruth] b&w; 2uc: James Van Trees

 

 

1949

Wagon Master [John Ford] b&w; 2uc: Archie Stout

1950

Rio Grande [John Ford] b&w; 2uc: Archie Stout

1950

Operation Pacific [George Waggner] b&w; sfx: H.F. Koenekamp & William McGann (dir)

1951

The Sea Hornet [Joseph Kane] b&w; spph: Ellis F. Thackery

1951

The Big Trees [Felix Feist] c; sfx: H.F. Koenekamp

1951

About Face [Roy Del Ruth] c

1951

Mara Maru [Gordon Douglas] b&w; was scheduled as ph or uncred cph (?); ph: Robert Burks

1951

The Man Behind the Gun [Felix Feist] c

1952

Thunder Over the Plains [André De Toth] c

1952

Crime Wave/The City Is Dark [André De Toth] b&w

1953

House of Wax [André De Toth] c; cph: J. Peverell Marley; uncred fill-in ph (when B. Glennon fell ill): Robert Burks; originally in Natural Vision (3-D)

1953

Riding Shotgun [André De Toth] c

1953

The Moonlighter [Roy Rowland] b&w; originally in Natural Vision (3-D)

1953

The Mad Magician [John Brahm] b&w; sfx: Dave Koehler; originally in Columbia 3-D

 

[Cap] with dir John Ford [hat] and actors Constance Towers and Jeffrey Hunter - "Sergeant Rutledge"

 

1959

Sergeant Rutledge [John Ford] c

1962

Lad: A Dog [Aram Avakian & Leslie H. Martinson] c

1963

The Man from Galveston [William Conrad] b&w; 57m; originally the unaired pilot for the tv-series 'Temple Houston' (1963-64)

 

 TELEVISION

1955

Jiminy Cricket Presents Bongo [Hamilton Luske] ep #24 (color) of 'Disneyland'; 2nd season, 1955-56; actually first half of 'Fun and Fancy Free' (1947); ph live action seq (dir by William Morgan); or ph Charles P. Boyle

1955

Disneyland: Frontierland - Davy Crockett [ep #4 'Davy Crockett's Keelboat Race' & #5 'Davy Crockett and the River Pirates' dir by Norman Foster] 5-part seg of 'Disneyland: Frontierland'-series, 1954-55/c; 2nd season, 1955; ep #4 + #5 also released theatrically (81m) in 1956

1955

The Goofy Success Story [Jack Kinney & Wolfgang Reitherman] anim + live action; ep #33 (b&w) of 'Disneyland'; 2nd season, 1955-56

1957

The Arsonist [Norman Foster] pilot (b&w) for unsold series 'Chicago 2-1-2'

1957

M Squad [ep #18 'The Long Ride' dir by David Lowell Rich] 117-part police series/b&w, 1957-60 (NBC-tv); 1st season, 1957-58

1958

State Trooper [ep #50 'The Doll Who Couldn't Sleep' dir by Stan Shpetner & #58 'Stay Lost, Little Girl' dir by John English] 106-part police series/b&w, 1956-59 (syndicated only); 2nd season, 1957-58

1958

The Restless Gun [ep #38 'The Peddler' dir by Edward Ludwig] pilot (ep 'Schlitz Playhouse of Stars') + 77-part western series/b&w, 1957-59 (NBC-tv); 1st season, 1957-58

1958

M Squad [ep #60 'The Take Over' dir by Don Medford & #64 'Ghost Town' dir by John Brahm] 2nd season, 1958-59; see 1957

1958

Cimarron City [ep #13 'The Bitter Lesson' dir by John Meredyth Lucas] 26-part western series/b&w, 1958-59 (NBC-tv)

1959

Markham [ep #1 'A Princely Sum' dir by Richard Bartlett] 59-part detective series/b&w, 1959-60 (CBS-tv)

 

 

1959

Bonanza/Ponderosa [pilot 'A Rose for Lotta' dir by Edward Ludwig] 431-part western series, 1959-73 (NBC-tv); 1st season, 1959-60

1959

The Betty Hutton Show [pilot 'Goldie Crosses the Tracks' dir by Edward Ludwig] 30-part sitcom series/b&w, 1959-60 (CBS-tv); other ph: Charles Van Enger

1959

Laramie [ep #7 'The Iron Captain' dir by Robert Sinclair] 124-part western series/b&w, 1959-63 (NBC-tv); 1st season, 1959-60

1959

Bourbon Street Beat [ep #15 'Inside Man' dir by Leslie H. Martinson, #34 'Green Hell' dir by Charles Rondeau, #36 'Wagon Show' dir by Robert B. Sinclair, #38 'Reunion' dir by William Hole Jr. (WHJ) & #39 'Teresa' dir by WHJ] 39-part detective series/b&w, 1959-60 (ABC-tv)

1959

The DuPont Show with June Allyson/The June Allyson Show [ep #12 'The Crossing' dir by André De Toth] 57-part dramatic anthology series/b&w, 1959-61 (CBS-tv); 1st season, 1959-60

1959

M Squad [ep #98 'A Debt of Honor' dir by Herman Hoffman (HH) & Francis D. Lyon & #101 'Needle in a Haystack' dir by HH] 3rd season, 1959-60; see 1957

1959

Hawaiian Eye [ep #19 'Hong Kong Passage' dir by Charles Haas] 134-part detective series/b&w, 1959-63 (ABC-tv); 1st season, 1959-60

1960

Bronco [ep #36 'Legacy of Twisted Creek' dir by André De Toth & #38 'La Rubia' dir by Reginald Le Borg] 68-part western series/b&w, 1958-62 (ABC-tv); 2nd season, 1959-60

1960

Sugarfoot [ep #57 'Blue Bonnet Stray' dir by Leslie Goodwins] 69-part western series/b&w, 1957-61 (ABC-tv); 3rd season, 1959-60

1960

Maverick [ep #81 'Hadley's Hunters' dir by Leslie H. Martinson] 124-part western series/b&w, 1957-62 (ABC-tv); 4th season, 1960-61 

1960

Coronado 9 [ep #16 'Wrong Odds' dir by William Witney] 39-part private eye series/b&w, 1960-61 (syndicated); other ph: Bud Thackery, Benjamin Kline & Ray Rennahan

1960

77 Sunset Strip [ep #45 'The Texas Doll' dir by André De Toth & #62 'Legend of Crystal Dart' dir by Montgomery Pittman] pilot (1957) + 206-part detective series/b&w, 1958-64 (ABC-tv); 2nd season, 1959-60

1960

Sugarfoot [ep #61 'Shadow Catcher' dir by Leslie Goodwins] 4th season, 1960-61; see above

1960

Lawman [35 ep dir by various] 156-part western series/b&w, 1958-62 (ABC-tv); 3rd season, 1960-61

1960

77 Sunset Strip [ep #76 'The Negotiable Blonde' dir by Mark Sandrich Jr., #85 'The Dresden Doll' dir by William J. Hole Jr. & #94 'Face in the Window' dir by Robert Douglas] 3rd season, 1960-61; see 1960

1961

Lawman [29 ep dir by various] 4th season, 1961-62; see 1960

1961

Cheyenne [ep #82 'Winchester Quarantine' dir by Paul Landres & #95 'A Man Called Ragan' dir by Richard C. Sarafian] 108-part western series/b&w, 1955-62 (ABC-tv); 6th season, 1961-62; ep #95 was also the pilot for the series 'The Dakotas'

1961

Hawaiian Eye [ep #82 'Two for the Money' dir by Robert Sparr & #103 'Rx Cricket' dir by Charles Rondeau] 3rd season, 1961-62; see 1959

1962

SurfSide 6 [ep #68 'Squeeze Play' dir by Robert Sparr & #74 'Midnight for Prince Charming' dir by George Waggner] 74-part detective series/b&w, 1960-62 (ABC-tv); 2nd season, 1961-62

1962

Hawaiian Eye [ep #113 'There'll Be Some Changes Made' dir by George Waggner] 4th season, 1962-63; see 1959

1962

Cheyenne [ep #100 'The Quick and the Deadly' dir by Paul Landres (PL), #101 'Indian Gold' dir by PL, #102 'Dark Decision' dir by Robert Sparr (RS), #103 'Pocketful of Stars' dir by RS & #104 'The Vanishing Breed' dir by RS] 7th season, 1962; see 1961 

1962

77 Sunset Strip [ep #152 'Leap, My Lovely' dir by Irving J. Moore, #161 'The Odds on Odette' dir by Charles Rondeau & #186 'Never to Have Loved' dir by William Conrad] 5th season, 1962-63; see 1960

1962

The Dakotas [13 ep dir by various] 19-part western series/b&w, 1963 (ABC-tv); other ph: Harold E. Stine; see 'Cheyenne' (1961)

1962

General Electric True/GE True/True [ep #30 'Heydrich Part 1', #31 'Heydrich Part 2' & #32 'Commando' dir by William Conrad] 33-part dramatic anthology series/b&w, 1962-63 (CBS-tv)

1963

77 Sunset Strip [20 ep dir by various] 6th season, 1963-64 (20 ep); see 1960

 

 FILMS AS DIRECTOR

1928

Perfect Crime [ph: James Wong Howe]

 

[Right] with actors Jack Pickford & Olive Borden - "Gang War"

 

1928

Gang War/All Square [ph: Virgil Miller]

1928

The Air Legion [ph: Paul Perry]

1929

Syncopation/Stepping High [ph: Dal Clawson, Frank Landi & George Webber]

1929

Joy Ride [?] ph: ?

1929

Girl of the Port [ph: Leo Tover]

1930

Around the Corner [ph: Joseph Walker] 68m

1930

Paradise Island [ph: Max Dupont] 68m

1931

In Line of Duty [ph: Archie Stout] 64m

1931

South of Santa Fe [+ ed] ph: Archie Stout; 60m

 

 MISCELLANEOUS

1912

A Hospital Hoax [?; short] actor (as Herbert Glennon); ph: ?

1914

The Patchwork Girl of Oz/L. Frank Baum's Whimsical Fairy Tale The Patchwork Girl of Oz/The Ragged Girl of Oz/The Raggedy Girl [J. Farrell MacDonald] actor (as Herbert Glennon); ph: Jim Crosby

1918

The Family Skeleton [Victor Schertzinger] co-scrpl; ph: Chester Lyons

1920

The Man From Kangaroo [Wilfred Lucas] asst dir; ph: Robert Doerrer

1920

The Shadow of Lightning Ridge [Wilfred Lucas] asst dir; ph: Robert Doerrer

1920

The Jackeroo of Coolabong/The Fighting Breed [Wilfred Lucas] asst dir; (also ph ?)

1930

Second Wife [Russell Mack] co-scrpl; ph: William Marshall