[Right] - "The Unfaithful" [1946]

With Vivien Leigh - "Gone With the Wind" [1939]

               

ERNEST HALLER

Born: 31 May 1896, Los Angeles, Calif., USA, as Ernest B. Haller.

Died: 21 October 1970, Marina del Rey, Calif., USA [car accident].

Career: After leaving school, worked as a bank clerk; entered film industry as actor for the Biograph Company in 1914. Switched to the camera department in 1915. Freelance since 1951.

Was a member of the ASC.

Awards: 'Oscar' AA nom [1938] for 'Jezebel'; 'Oscar' AA [1939; color; shared] for 'Gone With the Wind'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1940; b&w] for 'All This, and Heaven Too'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1945; b&w] for 'Mildred Pierce'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1950; color] for 'The Flame and the Arrow'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1962; b&w] for 'What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1963; b&w] for 'Lilies of the Field'.


 


'The longtime Hollywood cameraman Ernest Haller is probably best known for his work on 'Gone With the Wind', for which he earned his only Oscar. But his five nominations in fact tell more about his reputation within Hollywood itself. Haller produced quality work for 45 years. He came into his own during the 1950s and was known within industry circles for his expert location shooting.

Haller's roots in the film business went back to Hollywood's origins. His first work behind the camera came with an early serial, 'The Hazards of Helen'. He then moved his way up through the on-the-job training system which was then in force, and was credited for his first film as cinematographer in 1920.

At Warner Brothers during the early 1930s, work was fast and furious, and Haller helped grind films out at the rate of one every two months. He worked on every possible genre, and did what he was told. By the late 1930s Haller had worked his way up to strictly A-budget feature films. He worked with all the major stars on the Warner lot, from Errol Flynn to Humphrey Bogart to James Cagney. If he had a specialty it was photographing the films of Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. Indeed he won an Oscar nomination for Davis's 'Jezebel' and Crawford's 'Mildred Pierce'. The latter film was one of the pioneering efforts in the early days of film noir.

With the coming of age of independent film production in the 1950s, Haller began to freelance like nearly all other cameramen. He formally left Warner Bros. in 1951 and worked on some poor films, and also on some of Hollywood's best. In the latter category we certainly must include 'Rebel without a Cause', directed by Nicholas Ray and a pioneering effort in CinemaScope, and 'Man of the West' directed by Anthony Mann, a great director of westerns.

Yet despite his long association with Warner Bros. and other distinguished work, Haller will always be remembered for his work on 'Gone with the Wind'. He was not David O. Selznick's original choice for cinematographer, and he started long after production was well underway, replacing Lee Garmes. Historians note that although Haller received sole credit for the camerawork on the film, Lee Garmes was responsible for most of the first hour of the picture. Yet certainly the bulk of 'Gone With the Wind' is Haller's picture, and will always be noted as the most important color film made in Hollywood prior to the 1950s.' [Douglas Gomery]

·····

Ernie Haller, the wizard of gauze, took a good look at ingénue [Bette] Davis, who was to play the role of Malbro, a Park Avenue debutante [in 'The Rich Are Always with Us' (1931)]. She looked somewhat like the Tenniel drawings of 'Alice in Wonderland', with wide forehead, incredibly long neck, tiny mouth, and huge eyes. She also had an inclination to wiggle her body under stress and would squint in close-ups if not watched. Her assets were a good complexion, blue eyes that photographed steel gray, and an engaging profile. With expert makeup and given time to light her properly she could be made to look beautiful. [This he did, plus Orry-Kelly's clothes. For the very first time I had a certain chic.] He was destined to photograph fourteen of her pictures and have the distinction of being her favorite cameraman. [I presented an Academy Award to the winning cinematographer some years ago. I said, "It gives me extreme pleasure to present this award. Without our cameramen, where would we be today? They have made us what we are. True, they are miracle men, to whom we owe so much." Ernest Haller was my miracle man during all the glory years. I wish he were alive today to read this, although I told him so many times.] Thirty years later on 'What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?', he would have the opposite problem. For the first time he would not lie awake nights thinking up tricks to show her to advantage. For in that picture Davis was playing her own age and wanted to look as unattractive as possible. [From 'Bette Davis - Mother Goddam' by Whitney Stine with Bette Davis, 1974.]



 FILMS [1 reel = c. 10m]

1920

Love Is Everything [Whitman Bennett] b&w; ? reels; prod ?

1920

Why Women Sin/Neglected Wives [Burton King] b&w; 6 reels; prod Wistaria Productions

1920

Mothers of Men [Edward José] b&w; 6 reels; prod Edward José Productions

1920

The Inner Voice [R. William Neill] b&w; prod American Cinema Corporation

1920

Yes or No [R. William Neill] b&w; 6 reels; prod Norma Talmadge Film Corporation

1920

The Discarded Woman [Burton King] b&w; 6 reels; cph: Lon D. Littlefield; prod Burton King Productions

1920

For Love or Money/The Road to Arcady [Burton King] b&w; 6 (1920) & 5 (1921) reels; prod Burton King Productions

1920

The Common Sin/For Your Daughter's Sake [Burton King] b&w; 6 (1920) & 5 (1921) reels; prod Burton King Productions

1920

Trumpet Island [Tom Terriss] b&w; cph: Friend F. Baker; prod Vitagraph Company of America (VCA)

1920

Dead Men Tell No Tales [Tom Terriss] b&w; prod VCA

1921

The Gilded Lily [Robert Z. Leonard] b&w-c; prod Famous Players-Lasky Corporation (FPLC)

1921

Such a Little Queen [George Fawcett] b&w; 5 reels; prod Realart Pictures

1921

Salvation Nell [Kenneth Webb] b&w; prod Whitman Bennett Productions (WBP)

1921

Wife Against Wife [Whitman Bennett] b&w; 6 reels; prod WBP

1921

The Iron Trail [R. William Neill] b&w; prod WBP

1922

Outcast [Chet Withey] b&w; or ph John Seitz; prod FPLC

1923

The Ne'er-Do-Well [Alfred E. Green] b&w; addph: William Miller; prod FPLC

1923

Homeward Bound [Ralph Ince] b&w; prod FPLC

1923

Woman-Proof [Alfred E. Green] b&w; prod FPLC

1923

Pied Piper Malone [Alfred E. Green] b&w; prod FPLC

1924

Rough Ridin' [Richard Thorpe] b&w; 5 reels; prod Approved Pictures

1924

Empty Hearts [Al Santell] b&w; 6 reels; prod Banner Productions

1924

Three Keys [Edward J. Le Saint] b&w; 6 reels; prod Banner Productions

1924

Parisian Nights [Al Santell] b&w; prod Gothic Pictures

1925

Any Woman [Henry King] b&w; 6 reels; cph: William Schurr; prod FPLC

1925

High and Handsome/Winning His Stripes [Harry Garson] b&w; 6 reels; prod R-C Pictures

1925

The New Commandment [Howard Higgin] b&w; addph: Ernest G. Palmer; prod First National Pictures (FN)

1925

Bluebeard's Seven Wives [Al Santell] b&w; as Robert Haller; prod FN

1925

The Reckless Lady [Howard Higgin] b&w; prod FN

1926

The Dancer of Paris [Al Santell] b&w; prod FN

1926

Stacked Cards [Robert Eddy] b&w; 5 reels; prod Circle Productions

1926

The Wilderness Woman [Howard Higgin] b&w; prod Robert Kane Productions (RKP)

1926

The Great Deception [Howard Higgin] b&w; 6 reels; prod RKP

1926

Hair Trigger Baxter [Jack Nelson] b&w; 5 reels; or ph Ernest Miller; prod Independent Pictures

1926

The Prince of Tempters [Lothar Mendes] b&w; prod RKP

1927

Convoy [Joseph C. Boyle] b&w; prod RKP

1927

Broadway Nights [Joseph C. Boyle] b&w; prod RKP

1927

Dance Magic [Victor Halperin] b&w; prod RKP

1927

For the Love of Mike [Frank Capra] b&w; prod RKP

1927

French Dressing/Lessons for Wives [Allan Dwan] b&w; prod FN

1927

The Whip Woman [Joseph C. Boyle] b&w; 6 reels; prod FN

1928

Mad Hour [Joseph C. Boyle] b&w; prod FN

1928

Harold Teen [Mervyn LeRoy] b&w; prod FN

1928

Wheel of Chance [Alfred A. Santell] b&w; prod FN

1928

Out of the Ruins [John Francis Dillon] b&w; prod FN

1928

Naughty Baby/Reckless Rosie [Mervyn LeRoy] b&w; silent and sound (efx & music) versions; prod FN

1928

Weary River [Frank Lloyd] b&w; as Ernest Hallor; spph: Alvin Knechtel; silent and sound (efx, music & talking seq) versions; prod FN

1929

House of Horror/The Haunted House [Benjamin Christensen] b&w; cph: Sol Polito; silent and sound (talking seq, efx & music) versions; prod FN

1929

The Girl in the Glass Cage [Ralph Dawson] b&w; silent and sound (talking seq & music) versions; prod FN

1929

Drag/Parasites [Frank Lloyd] b&w; as Ernest Hallor; silent and sound versions; prod FN

1929

Dark Streets [Frank Lloyd] b&w; 6 reels; as Ernest Hallor; silent and sound versions; prod FN

1929

Young Nowheres [Frank Lloyd] b&w; 65m; silent and sound versions; prod FN

1929

Wedding Rings/The Dark Swan [William Beaudine] b&w; silent and sound versions; prod FN

1929

Son of the Gods [Frank Lloyd] b&w + color seq; silent and sound versions; prod FN

1930

A Notorious Affair [Lloyd Bacon] b&w; 67m

1930

The Dawn Patrol/Flight Commander [Howard Hawks] b&w; aph: Elmer Dyer

1930

One Night at Susie's [John Francis Dillon] b&w

1930

Sunny [William A. Seiter] b&w; uncred cph: Arthur Reeves

1930

Los que danzan [Alfredo del Diestro & William C. McGann] b&w; Spanish language version of 'Those Who Dance' (d: William Beaudine; ph: Sid Hickox)

1930

The Lash/Adiós [Frank Lloyd] Vitascope & spherical/b&w

1930

Ten Cents a Dance [Lionel Barrymore] b&w; cph: Gilbert Warrenton; a Spanish language version, 'Carne de cabaret', was dir by Christy Cabanne & Eduardo Arozamena and ph by Allen Siegler

1930

Millie [John Francis Dillon] b&w

1930

The Finger Points [John Francis Dillon] b&w; filmed 1930-31

1931

Chances/Changes [Allan Dwan] b&w

1931

I Like Your Nerve [William McGann] b&w; 62m

1931

24 Hours/The Hours Between [Marion Gering] b&w; 66m

1931

Honor of the Family [Lloyd Bacon] b&w; 63m

1931

Blonde Crazy/Larceny Lane [Roy Del Ruth] b&w; cph: Sid Hickox

1931

Girls About Town [George Cukor] b&w; 66m

1931

Compromised/We Three [John G. Adolfi (replaced John Francis Dillon)] b&w; 65m

1931

The Woman from Monte Carlo [Michael Curtiz] b&w; 65m

1931

The Rich Are Always with Us [Alfred E. Green] b&w

1932

Doctor X [Michael Curtiz] b&w; uncred co-extra cameraman; ph: Richard Towers; film was made in b&w and color (ph: Ray Rennahan) versions

1932

Street of Women [Archie Mayo] b&w; 59m

1932

Night After Night [Archie Mayo] b&w

1932

The Crash [William Dieterle] b&w; 58m

1932

Scarlet Dawn [William Dieterle] b&w; 57m

1932

King of the Jungle [Max Marcin & H. Bruce Humberstone] b&w; trick ph: Gordon Jennings

1932

Murders in the Zoo [Edward Sutherland] b&w; 62m

1933

International House [Edward Sutherland] b&w; 68m; spec pfx: Farciot Edouart, Loyal Griggs, Al Myers & Dewey Wrigley

1933

The Emperor Jones [Dudley Murphy] b&w; restored in 2003

1933

The House on 56th Street [Robert Florey] b&w; 68m

1933

Easy to Love [William Keighley] b&w; 61m

1933

Journal of a Crime [William Keighley (replaced G.W. Pabst)] b&w; 65m

1934

Merry Wives of Reno [H. Bruce Humberstone] b&w; 64m

1934

The Key/High Peril [Michael Curtiz (replaced Archie Mayo)] b&w

1934

British Agent [Michael Curtiz (replaced Frank Borzage)] b&w

1934

Desirable [Archie Mayo] b&w; 68m

1934

The Firebird [William Dieterle] b&w

1934

The Secret Bride/Concealment [William Dieterle] b&w; 64m

1934

A Midsummer Night's Dream [Max Reinhardt & William Dieterle] b&w; uncred cph (Haller worked on the film for about 8 weeks before leaving over 'disagreements about the lighting'); ph: Hal Mohr (replaced E. Haller); filmed 1934-35

1935

Mary Jane's Pa/Wanderlust [William Keighley] b&w

1935

Age of Indiscretion [Edward Ludwig] b&w; uncred cph: George Folsey

Luise Rainer - dir Robert Z. Leonard - EH [seated] - c.op Al Roberts [?] - William Powell - "Escapade"

1935

Escapade/Masquerade/Seitensprung [Robert Z. Leonard] b&w; remake of 'Maskerade' (1934, Willi Forst; ph: Franz Planer)

1935

Captain Blood [Michael Curtiz] b&w; cph: Hal Mohr; spec pfx: Fred Jackman

1935

Dangerous [Alfred E. Green] b&w

1935

The Voice of Bugle Ann [Richard Thorpe] b&w

1936

Petticoat Fever [George Fitzmaurice] b&w

1936

Public Enemy's Wife/G-Man's Wife [Nick Grinde] b&w; 69m

1936

The Captain's Kid [Nick Grinde] b&w

1936

Mountain Justice [Michael Curtiz] b&w

1936

The Great O'Malley [William Dieterle] b&w

1936

Call It a Day [Archie Mayo] b&w

1937

That Certain Woman [Edmund Goulding] b&w

1937

The Great Garrick [James Whale] b&w

1937

Jezebel [William Wyler] b&w; filmed 1937-38

1938

Four's a Crowd [Michael Curtiz] b&w

1938

Four Daughters [Michael Curtiz] b&w

1938

Brother Rat [William Keighley] b&w

1938

Dark Victory [Edmund Goulding] b&w

1939

Confessions of a Nazi Spy [Anatole Litvak] b&w; uncred fill-in ph (while S. Polito was ill); ph: Sol Polito

1939

Daughters Courageous/American Family/A Family Affair/Family Reunion [Michael Curtiz] b&w; uncred cph; ph: James Wong Howe

1939

Gone With the Wind [Victor Fleming (dir 93 days) (replaced George Cukor, who was brought onto the project in September 1936; dir 18 days); add d: Sam Wood (fill-in for 24 days), Sidney Franklin, William Wellman, a.o.] c; Technicolor assoc ph: Ray Rennahan & Wilfrid M. Cline; replaced ph Lee Garmes; principal ph started 26 January with Lee Garmes as ph; principal ph 26 January-15 February 1939 & 2 March-1 July 1939; retakes ph until 11 November 1939; 'Burning of Atlanta' seq ph on the evening of Saturday 10 December 1938 with 7 cameras by Harold Rosson (ph superv Ray Rennahan); 'The release prints made during the first few years used the technology then available at Technicolor, with a faint b&w 'key' image and sound track printed first, on normal b&w film, then the three color dye-transfer images added to the print. The first copies in the improved Technicolor printing process came forth in 1954, after the dyes were refined to the point at which the b&w 'key' image was no longer needed. In 1967, MGM [Metrocolor] made a single strip interpositive from the 3-strip Technicolor negative. From this interpositive, new printing negatives were made on Eastman Color. In the late 1980s, the film was restored using the Technicolor negatives.' [From article by Richard P. May in 'American Cinematographer', April 1989.] [see Lee Garmes]

1939

The Roaring Twenties [Raoul Walsh] b&w; sfx ph: Edwin DuPar & Byron Haskin

1939

Invisible Stripes [Lloyd Bacon] b&w; sfx ph: Byron Haskin

1939

It All Came True [Lewis Seiler] b&w; sfx ph: Edwin DuPar & Byron Haskin

1940

All This, and Heaven Too [Anatole Litvak] sfx ph: Byron Haskin & Rex Wimpy

1940

No Time for Comedy/A Guy with a Grin [William Keighley] b&w

1940

Honeymoon for Three [Lloyd Bacon] b&w

1940

Footsteps in the Dark [Lloyd Bacon] b&w; sfx ph: Rex Wimpy

1940

The Great Lie [Edmund Goulding] b&w; uncred fill-in ph (while Tony Gaudio had influenza); ph: Tony Gaudio

[Left] with dir William Keighley

"The Bride Came C.O.D."

1941

The Bride Came C.O.D. [William Keighley] b&w; sfx ph: Byron Haskin & Rex Wimpy

1941

Manpower [Raoul Walsh] b&w; sfx ph: Byron Haskin & H.F. Koenekamp

1941

Minstrel Days [Bobby Connolly] b&w; mus short/19m; ep series 'Broadway Brevities'

1941

The Maltese Falcon [John Huston] b&w; uncred addph; ph: Arthur Edeson

1941

Blues in the Night [Anatole Litvak] b&w; montages: Don Siegel

1941

The Gay Parisian (Gaîté parisienne) [Jean Negulesco] c; dance short/20m

1941

Spanish Fiesta (Capriccio espagnol) [Jean Negulesco] c; dance short/19m; cph: Allen M. Davey

1941

In This Our Life [John Huston] b&w; sfx ph: Robert Burks & Byron Haskin

1942

The Daughter of Rosie O'Grady [Jean Negulesco] b&w; mus short/20m

1942

George Washington Slept Here [William Keighley] b&w

1942

Princess O'Rourke [Norman Krasna] b&w

1942

Devotion [Curtis Bernhardt] b&w; montages: Don Siegel & James Leicester; filmed 1942-43; released 1946

[Left] with Sam Wood, Ingrid Bergman & Gary Cooper

"Saratoga Trunk"

1943

[Edna Ferber's] Saratoga Trunk [Sam Wood] b&w; uncred fill-in ph: Bert Glennon (while E. Haller was ill); sfx ph: Lawrence Butler

1943

Cavalcade of Dance [Jean Negulesco] b&w; mus short/11m

1943

The Present with a Future [Vincent Sherman] b&w; War Bonds Trailer/3m

1943

Rhapsody in Blue [- The Story of George Gershwin] [Irving Rapper] b&w; cph add musical numbers; ph: Sol Polito

1943

Mr. Skeffington [Vincent Sherman] b&w; montages: James Leicester; color tests were made, but film was ph in b&w; filmed 1943-44

1944

The Doughgirls [James V. Kern] b&w

1944

Mildred Pierce [Michael Curtiz] b&w; sfx ph: Willard Van Enger; montages: James Leicester; filmed 1944-45

1945

A Stolen Life [Curtis Bernhardt] b&w; cph: Sol Polito (because of the difficulty of the trick photography Polito and Haller shared cinematography credit); sfx: William McGann (dir), E. Roy Davidson (dir), Willard Van Enger & Russell Collings

1945

The Verdict [Don Siegel] b&w; uncred fill-in ph & sfx ph: Robert Burks; 'My cameraman was Ernie Haller, who was Bette Davis' cameraman. He obviously felt that because I was so young, the picture was beneath him. I found myself stumbling through in a kind of shock at the trouble I had lining up shots. Well one day Haller got pulled off the picture to make a test with Bette Davis and I got my regular cameraman, Robert Burks, who I had wanted in the first place, and all of a sudden, everything was great. When Haller came back I talked to him and found that he had never read the script. From then on I had him read the script in front of me before we shot each scene.' [Don Siegel in 'Don Siegel: Director' by Stuart M. Kaminsky, 1974.]

1945

Humoresque [Jean Negulesco] b&w; sfx ph: Willard Van Enger; montages: James Leicester; filmed 1945-46; James Wong Howe was originally scheduled as doph with dir Irving Rapper

[Right] with actress Bette Davis

"Deception"

1946

Deception [Irving Rapper] b&w; sfx ph: Edwin DuPar; Irving Rapper: 'For 'Deception', I used Ernest Haller as my cameraman instead of Sol Polito, my usual one. The late Sol Polito was a no-nonsense technician, whereas Ernest Haller is almost a cosmetician's cameraman, very concerned with making the stars look beautiful.' Bette Davis: 'I was not as young anymore, thirty-nine to be exact, and I insisted on Haller - plus I was overweight, due to the fact, as I found out during filming, I was pregnant. I needed him. Irving had nothing to say about it. Thank God cameramen like Haller could make us look better than we did. Why did Irving Rapper resent this? He should have been grateful!!!' [From 'Bette Davis - Mother Goddam']

1946

The Unfaithful [Vincent Sherman] b&w; sfx ph: Robert Burks; filmed 1946-47

1947

My Girl Tisa [Elliott Nugent] b&w; sfx ph: H.F. Koenekamp & Harry Barndollar

1947

Winter Meeting [Bretaigne Windust] b&w; sfx ph: H.F. Koenekamp & Harry Barndollar

1948

My Dream Is Yours [Michael Curtiz] c; cph: Wilfred M. Cline; sfx ph: Edwin DuPar

1949

Chain Lightning [Stuart Heisler] b&w; sfx ph: H.F. Koenekamp, Edwin DuPar, William McGann & Harry Barndollar

1949

Always Leave Them Laughing [Roy Del Ruth] b&w

1949

The Flame and the Arrow [Jacques Tourneur] c

1950

Dallas [Stuart Heisler] c

1950

Jim Thorpe - All-American/Man of Bronze [Michael Curtiz] b&w

1951

On Moonlight Bay [Roy Del Ruth & (fill-in) Raoul Walsh] c; sfx ph: H.F. Koenekamp

1951

Pictura [: Adventure in Art] [E.A. Dupont (framing seq); Luciano Emmer (seg #1 'The Lost Paradise' & #2 'The Legend of St. Ursula'); Lauro Venturi (seg #3 'Francisco Goya'); Robert Hessens & Olga Lipska (seg #4 'Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec'); Alain Resnais (seg #5 'Paul Gauguin'); Mark Sorkin (seg #6 'Grant Wood')] b&w; doc/80m; ph linking scenes; ph: Mario Bava (spec ph & efx seg #2), Mario Craveri, John Lewis & Ubaldo Marelli

1951

Monsoon [Rodney Amateau] c; 2uc: Malcolm Gasper; filmed in India

1952

Jhansi ki Rani/The Tiger and the Flame [Sohrab Modi] c; assoc ph: M. Malhotra & T.D. Sarpotdar; filmed in India

1953

Carnival Story [Kurt Neumann] c; filmed in Germany

1953

Rummelplatz der Liebe/Circus of Love  [Kurt Neumann] c; German language version of 'Carnival Story'; filmed in Germany

1954

Magic Fire [William Dieterle] c; filmed in Germany

1955

Rebel Without a Cause [Nicholas Ray] cs/c; started as a b&w CinemaScope film, but after objections from Twentieth Century-Fox the film was shot in color

1955

The Come-On [Russell Birdwell] sus/b&w

1955

Dakota Incident [Lewis R. Foster] c; filmed 1955-56

1956

Strange Intruder [Irving Rapper] b&w

1956

The Cruel Tower [Lew Landers] b&w

1956

Men in War [Anthony Mann] b&w; spec pfx: Louis DeWitt & Jack Rabin

1956

The Young Don't Cry [Alfred L. Werker] b&w

1957

Hell on Devil's Island [Christian Nyby] RegalScope/b&w

1957

Back from the Dead/Bury Me Dead [Charles Marquis Warren] RegalScope/b&w

1957

Plunder Road [Hubert Cornfield] RegalScope/b&w; pfx: Louis DeWitt & Jack Rabin

1957

God's Little Acre [Anthony Mann] b&w; 106m, 114m & 120m (UCLA reconstructed version); spec pfx: Louis DeWitt & Jack Rabin

1957

Hell's Five Hours [Jack L. Copeland] b&w

1958

Man of the West [Anthony Mann] cs/c

1958

Speed Crazy [William Hole Jr.] b&w

1958

The Miracle [Irving Rapper & (uncred battle scenes) Gordon Douglas] tr/c; replaced scheduled ph Harry Stradling

1959

The 3rd Voice [Hubert Cornfield] cs/b&w

1959

The Boy and the Pirates [Bert I. Gordon] Perceptovision/c

1960

Why Must I Die?/13 Steps to Death/Girl on Death Row [Roy Del Ruth] b&w

1960

Three Blondes in His Life [Leon Chooluck] b&w

1960

Rebellion in Cuba/Chivato [Albert C. Gannaway] b&w

1961

Armored Command [Byron Haskin] b&w; filmed in Germany

1961

[I] Married Too Young [George Moskov] b&w

1961

Fear No More [Bernard Wiesen] b&w

1962

Pressure Point [Hubert Cornfield] b&w

1962

What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? [Robert Aldrich] b&w

1963

Lilies of the Field [Ralph Nelson] b&w

1963

Dead Ringer/Dead Image [Paul Henreid] b&w

1965

The Restless Ones [Dick Ross] b&w; moral propaganda feature film for Billy Graham


 TELEVISION

1957

Suspicion [ep #9 'The Flight' dir by James Neilson & #28 'Fraction of a Second' dir by John Brahm (with actress Bette Davis)] 41-part suspense anthology series/b&w, 1957-58 (live & film) (NBC-tv)

1958

Alfred Hitchcock Presents [ep #133 'Out There - Darkness' dir by Paul Henreid (with actress Bette Davis)] 268-part suspense anthology series/b&w, 1955-62 (CBS-tv & NBC-tv); 4th season, 1958-59; in September 1962 the show was expanded to an hour and retitled 'The Alfred Hitchcock Hour'

1960

Route 66 [ep #2  'A Lance of Straw' dir by Roger Kay] 116-part adventure series/b&w, 1960-64 (CBS-tv); 1st season, 1960-61

1963

Trouble in Paradise [Leslie Stevens] unsold pilot for series 'Mr. Kingston'

1966

Star Trek [ep #3 'Where No Man Has Gone Before' dir by James Goldstone] 80-part (1 unaired) science fiction series, 1966-69 (NBC-tv); 1st season, 1966-67; E. Haller came out of semi-retirement to serve as doph; director James Goldstone recommended Haller at the last minute, after attempts to locate a cameraman had proved problematic

1967

The Christophers [ep 'Father and Son', 'Thomas Jefferson', a.o. dir by Jack Denove] religious series, 1952-?


 FILMS AS CAMERA ASSISTANT

1914

The Hazards of Helen [J.P. McGowan & James Davis; 119-part serial] ph: Arthur Miller

1917

Wolves of the Rail [William S. Hart] ph: Joe August

1917

Flare-Up Sal [Roy William Neill] co-c.asst; ph: John S. Stumar