GREAT CINEMATOGRAPHERS


 

   


RUSSELL METTY

 

Born: 20 September 1906, Los Angeles, Calif., USA, as Russell Louis Metty.

Died: 28 April 1978, Canoga Park, Calif., USA.

Career: Started c. 1925 as asst with Standard Film Laboratory, then to Paramount working in the camera dept. Joined RKO in 1929.

Was a member of the ASC.

Appeared [archive] in the tv-doc 'Making 'The Misfits'' [2001, Gail Levin; ph: Dewald Aukema].

Awards: Golden Laurel Award nom [1959; color] for 'Imitation of Life'; 'Oscar' AA [1960; color] for 'Spartacus'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1961; color] for 'Flower Drum Song'; 'Emmy' Award nom [1970/1] for 'Tribes'; 'Emmy' Award nom [1972/3] for 'The Waltons'.



'It was only with 'The Stranger' in 1945, and the subsequent move to Universal in 1947, that Russell Metty made the transition from being a capable cameraman to a great one. Whether or not Welles had a creative place in this, 'The Stranger' would seem to be the first unmistakably Metty film, stamped with what became his highly distinctive use of light and shadow. In particular, his economy with and distribution of lights is frequently such that, as characters move around a room, they shift in and out of shadowed areas in an unusual way for a Hollywood movie, in which - with certain obvious exceptions such as film noir - a generally 'high key' evenness of illumination prevails. The effect is of constantly changing patterns of lighting, shading and silhouetting on faces and bodies which runs through the mise-en-scène like a rippling 'painting with light', independently of the director's contribution. For example, the first scene between Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Preston in 'The Lady Gambles' [1949], a three minute take in a hotel room, is somewhat awkwardly directed in terms of character staging and acting, but is quite subtle in the play of light and shade on the characters' faces. 'Ivy' [1947], as Charles Higham and Joel Greenberg in 'Hollywood in the Forties' [The Tantivy Press/A.S. Barnes & Co.] point out, is a tour­de-force of Metty's art. They cite in particular the opening scene at the fortune-teller's, but the whole film is beautifully lit, with a range of effects from the dramatically chiaroscuro to the delicately patterned. The former may be seen above all in the expressionistic imagery of the poison sequences, in which, as Joan Fontaine's Ivy obtains the poison, she is so positioned and lit that she becomes faceless and bodiless, with just her arms, like white tentacles, reaching to spoon the poison into her purse. The beautiful butterfly of the earlier scenes here becomes a spider.

In both of these films, Metty's photography seems to me the best thing about them. In his late '40s work at least, this was not unusual: 'Arch of Triumph' [1946] is another example, Metty's low key photography contributing far more effectively than Milestone's direction to the film's noir atmosphere of angst and paranoia. Then, in the '50s, Metty was teamed with Douglas Sirk. The combination of talents could scarcely be more auspicious: a director with a superb eye for visual composition and a cameraman with an impeccable touch in the subtleties of light and shade. The difference between 'All I Desire' [1952-53] and 'There's Always Tomorrow' [1955] in terms of mise-en-scène is not the compositions - Sirk's visual sense is equally stunning in both movies - but the lighting. Whereas Carl Guthrie in 'All I Desire' executes Sirk's shots faultlessly, Metty in 'There's Always Tomorrow' transforms them, with his nuances of lighting, into dazzling examples of a cameraman's art.

Brilliant in black and white, Metty could be even more remarkable in color: is there a more beautiful film of the '50s then 'All That Heaven Allows'? Whereas other cameramen filming in color would feel obliged to increase the overall illumination, Metty frequently films with the same play of light and shadow as in black and white. The scenes in the old mill in 'All That Heaven Allows' contain shadow and silhouette effects that even by the standards of today look extraordinary. Mary-Beth Haralovich, looking into the Universal archives on Sirk's movies, has discovered that Metty allowed no-one to interfere with his work, including the Technicolor consultant, one of whom was assigned to every Technicolor movie to monitor the hues and contrasts. For such intransigence, we can certainly be grateful. [Not until 'A Time to Love and a Time to Die' (1957) did Sirk and Metty switch to Eastmancolor.] She also discovered that Sirk and Metty filmed very quickly, regularly finishing ahead of schedule and under budget. Clearly that would have endeared them to Universal.

Another of Metty's '50s masterworks, 'Touch of Evil', is in dramatic contrast to his films with Sirk. Sirk may have used wide angle lenses extensively [e.g. 'Written on the Wind'] and long takes occasionally, but Welles pushed everything to extremes: very wide angle lenses, very long, elaborate takes, fast tracks, sweeping cranes and harsh, slashing lighting. The Wellesian bravura of the mise-en-scène is dizzying, but Metty's control looks perfect. Certainly Charlton Heston eulogizes his work in 'The Actor's Life', stating that the speed with which Metty worked was exceptional in that, unlike with other cameramen, speed did not mean a sacrifice of quality.

Metty eventually won an Oscar for 'Spartacus', but the recognition of his talents was ridiculously overdue. He had been brilliant for years, only the films weren't the sort that attracted the attention of the Hollywood establishment. Nor were most of the films that he made through the '60s, although, on the evidence of those I've seen, his style continued to be similarly distinctive. Within the Hollywood hierarchy, Metty may have been the top cameraman at Universal, but Universal was a 'minor' studio. However, true cinéastes would place him considerably higher than that.' [Michael Walker in 'Film Dope', #42, October 1989.]

 

[Left] with dir Ray McCarey and actress Elaine Shepard [screen-test, May 1943]

 

'Charlton Heston, who had worked with him [Russell Metty] on 'Touch of Evil', insisted on Metty for 'The War Lord'. "Russ Metty is unquestionably one of the great cameramen. He is nearly the only one of them who is also fast." [Producer Walter] Seltzer describes the cameraman and his crew at work: "They had a series of hand signals. You never heard them talk or yell or scream. It was like a third base coach giving directions to the batter. Frequently they would be ready while the actors were still walking off the set to go to their dressing rooms to sit down." Characteristically, all of Universal's color pictures of the 1960s were very brightly lit; even a serious drama had a musical-comedy look, which definitely was not what Schaffner, Seltzer, and Heston wanted for 'The War Lord'. Grateful for the opportunity and challenge, Metty, who had long worked in the Universal flat lighting style, used gels on the lights to add to the medieval orange look of the period, providing a low-key, darker but richer, ominous visual quality to the film. Consequently, 'The War Lord' does not look like a Universal picture - there are shadows in the film. "It was exquisitely photographed," states another Metty admirer, Franklin Schaffner. This did not delight Universal; Metty's lighting would be sharply criticized.' [From 'Franklin J. Schaffner' by Erwin Kim, 1985.]


 

 FILMS

1934

West of the Pecos [Phil Rosen] b&w; 68m; cph: James Van Trees

1936

Night Waitress [Lew Landers] b&w; 56m

1936

They Wanted to Marry [Lew Landers] b&w; 60m

1937

Behind the Headlines [Richard Rosson] b&w; 58m; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1937

You Can't Beat Love [Christy Cabanne] b&w; 62m

1937

Annapolis Salute/Salute to Romance [Christy Cabanne] b&w; 65m; sfx: Vernon L. Walker & Russell A. Cully

1937

Forty Naughty Girls [Edward Cline] b&w; 63m

1937

Bringing Up Baby [Howard Hawks] b&w; spec pfx: Vernon L. Walker

1937

Edgar and Goliath [Leslie Goodwins] b&w; short/17m; ep #39 of 'Mr. Average Man'-series

1937

The Dummy Owner [Jean Yarbrough] b&w; short/18m; a Leon Errol comedy

1938

Ears of Experience [Leslie Goodwins] b&w; short/18m; ep #40 of 'Mr. Average Man'-series

1938

Stage Fright [Leslie Goodwins] b&w; short/18m; a Leon Errol comedy

1938

Affairs of Annabel [Ben Stoloff & (uncred) Lew Landers] b&w; 68m

1938

Mr. Doodle Kicks Off [Leslie Goodwins] b&w

1938

Annabel Takes a Tour/Annabel Takes a Trip [Lew Landers] b&w; 67m

1938

Next Time I Marry/Trailer Romance [Garson Kanin] b&w; 64m

1938

The Great Man Votes [Garson Kanin] b&w

1939

Only Angels Have Wings [Howard Hawks] b&w; 2uc; ph: Joseph Walker

1939

The Girl and the Gambler [Lew Landers] b&w; 63m; uncred cph: J. Roy Hunt

1939

Career [Leigh Jason] started filming, but was replaced after 1 week by ph Frank Redman

1939

Bad Lands [Lew Landers] started filming, but was replaced by ph Frank Redman

1939

The Spellbinder [Jack Hively] b&w; 69m

1939

Everything's on Ice/Frolics on Ice [Erle C. Kenton] b&w; 65m

1939

Three Sons [Jack Hively] b&w

1939

That's Right - You're Wrong [David Butler] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1939

Scrappily Married [Arthur Ripley] b&w; short/19m; a Leon Errol comedy

1939

Irene [Herbert Wilcox] b&w + c (night of the ball seq); sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1940

Curtain Call [Frank Woodruff] b&w; 63m

1940

Sunk by the Census [Harry D'Arcy] b&w; short/18m; ep #55 of 'Mr. Average Man'-series

1940

Dance, Girl, Dance [Dorothy Arzner (replaced Roy Del Ruth)] b&w; uncred cph (?): Joseph H. August; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1940

Too Many Girls [George Abbott] b&w; fill-in ph (while F. Redman was attending his father's funeral); ph: Frank Redman; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1940

Citizen Kane [Orson Welles] b&w; uncred spec cons & ph make-up/wardrobe tests; ph: Gregg Toland

1940

No, No, Nanette [Herbert Wilcox] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1940

A Girl, a Guy, and a Gob/The Navy Steps Out [Richard Wallace] b&w; cph: Merritt Gerstad (first 2 weeks); sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1941

Sunny [Herbert Wilcox] b&w; ; uncred background ph: J. Roy Hunt; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1941

Weekend for Three [Irving Reis] b&w; 65m

1941

Four Jacks and a Jill [Jack Hively] b&w; 67m; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1941

Joan of Paris [Robert Stevenson] b&w

1941

The Magnificent Ambersons [Orson Welles] b&w; uncred ph revised ending (dir by Robert Wise); ph: Stanley Cortez

1942

Mexican Spitfire Sees a Ghost [Leslie Goodwins] b&w

1942

Framing Father [Charles E. Roberts] b&w; short/18m; a Leon Errol comedy

1942

Army Surgeon [A. Edward Sutherland] b&w; 63m; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1942

The Big Street [Irving Reis] b&w; uncred background ph: Harry Perry; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1942

The Falcon's Brother [Stanley Logan] b&w; 63m; 4th film in 13-part 'The Falcon'-series (RKO, 1941-46)

1942

Two for the Money [Lloyd French] b&w; short/17m; ep #67 of 'Mr. Average Man'-series

1942

Dear! Deer! [Ben Homes] b&w; short/17m; a Leon Errol comedy

1942

Forever and a Day/The Changing World [Frank Lloyd (London blitz seq), Robert Stevenson, René Clair ('1897' seq; replaced Alfred Hitchcock), Victor Saville, Cedric Hardwicke, Herbert Wilcox & Edmund Goulding] b&w; uncred ph; other (uncred) ph: Robert De Grasse, Lee Garmes & Nicholas Musuraca; spec pfx: Vernon L. Walker; filmed May 1941-January 1943

1942

Hitler's Children [Edward Dmytryk (replaced Irving Reis)] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1943

Double Up [Ben Holmes] b&w; short/18m; a Leon Errol comedy

1943

Not On My Account [Charles E. Roberts] b&w; short/17m; ep #73 of 'Mr. Average Man'-series

1943

The Sky's the Limit [Edward H. Griffith] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1943

Behind the Rising Sun [Edward Dmytryk] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1943

Around the World [Allan Dwan] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1943

Government Girl [Dudley Nichols] b&w; background ph Washington, D.C.; ph: Frank Redman

 

RKO head Charles Koerner - Ginger Rogers - prod David Hempstead - Edward Dmytryk -

RM - script Mercy Weireter - Robert Ryan - "Tender Comrade"

 

1943

Tender Comrade [Edward Dmytryk] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1943

Seven Days Ashore [John H. Auer] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1944

Triple Trouble [Harry D'Arcy] b&w; short/16m; a Leon Errol comedy

1944

Music in Manhattan [John H. Auer] b&w

1944

The Master Race [Herbert J. Biberman] b&w

1944

Betrayal from the East [William Berke] b&w; sfx: Vernon L. Walker

1944

It's in the Bag!/The Fifth Chair [Richard Wallace] b&w

1944

G.I. Joe/The Story of G.I. Joe/War Correspondent [William A. Wellman] b&w; ph miniatures (+ spec pfx): Howard Anderson; dir Leslie Fenton started the film with ph Archie Stout in March; prod shut down in May and resumed on 15 November

1945

Pardon My Past [Leslie Fenton] b&w

1945

Whistle Stop [Léonide Moguy] b&w; spec pfx: R.O. Binger

1945

Breakfast in Hollywood/The Mad Hatter [Harold Schuster] b&w

1945

The Stranger/Date with Destiny [Orson Welles] b&w; sfx: Harry Redmond Jr.

1946

The Perfect Marriage [Lewis Allen] b&w; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1946

The Private Affairs of Bel Ami/Women of Paris [Albert Lewin] b&w; uncred cph: John Mescall (replaced Metty who left to work on 'Arch of Triumph')

1946

Arch of Triumph [Lewis Milestone] b&w; 120m & 133m; filmed July-November 1946 & (add scenes) December 1946-February 1947

1946

Ivy [Sam Wood] b&w; aph: Paul Mantz; spph: David S. Horsley

1947

Ride the Pink Horse [Robert Montgomery] b&w; uncred cph: Maury Gertsman

 

With Ann Blyth - "A Woman's Vengeance"

 

1947

A Woman's Vengeance/The Gioconda Smile [Zoltan Korda] b&w

1947

All My Sons [Irving Reis] b&w; sfx: David S. Horsley

1948

Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid [Irving Pichel] b&w; uwph: David S. Horsley

1948

Kiss the Blood Off My Hands/Blood On My Hands [Norman Foster] b&w; spph (+ spec pfx): David S. Horsley

1948

You Gotta Stay Happy [H.C. Potter] b&w; spph: David S. Horsley

1948

We Were Strangers [John Huston] b&w; sfx: Lawrence W. Butler

1948

The Lady Gambles [Michael Gordon] b&w; sfx: David S. Horsley

1949

Curtain Call at Cactus Creek/Take the Stage [Charles Lamont] c

1949

Bagdad [Charles Lamont] c

1949

Buccaneer's Girl [Frederick De Cordova] c; sfx: David S. Horsley

1949

Sierra [Alfred E. Green] c

1950

Peggy [Frederick De Cordova] c

1950

The Desert Hawk [Frederick De Cordova] c

1950

Wyoming Mail [Reginald Le Borg] c

1950

Katie Did It [Frederick De Cordova] b&w; spph: David S. Horsley

1950

Up Front [Alexander Hall] b&w

1950

Little Egypt/Chicago Masquerade [Frederick De Cordova] c

1951

The Golden Horde [of Genghis Khan] [George Sherman] c

1951

The Raging Tide [George Sherman] b&w; spph: David S. Horsley

1951

Flame of Araby/Flame of the Desert [Charles Lamont] c

1951

The Treasure of Lost Canyon [Ted Tetzlaff] c

1951

The World in His Arms [Raoul Walsh] c; spph: David S. Horsley

1951

Scarlet Angel [Sidney Salkow] c

 

 

1952

Against All Flags [George Sherman & (uncred 2 days of add swordplay scenes) Douglas Sirk] c; spph: David S. Horsley

1952

Yankee Buccaneer [Frederick De Cordova] c; spph: David S. Horsley

1952

Because of You [Joseph Pevney] b&w

1952

Seminole [Budd Boetticher] c

1952

The Man from the Alamo [Budd Boetticher] c

1952

Take Me to Town [Douglas Sirk] c

1952

The Veils of Bagdad [George Sherman] c

1953

The Bond Between Us [Will Cowan] b&w; doc/?m; prod for the U.S. Department of the Treasury

1953

It Happens Every Thursday [Joseph Pevney] b&w

1953

Tumbleweed/Three Were Renegades [Nathan Juran] c

1953

Taza, Son of Cochise [Douglas Sirk] c; originally filmed in 3-D; 'Universal's 'Taza, Son of Cochise' played quite well in 3-D, as director Sirk and cinematographer Metty composed every shot with a foreground set-piece - from a dead tree to a wagon wheel - to lend perspective and depth to their compositions. Since the film was shot entirely on location at Arches National Park, they had spectacular scenery at their command, and made excellent use of it. Even the gimmicky shots are unusually well done. Other films have Indians throwing burning torches, but in this film the torch fills the screen, with considerable impact. Other in-your-face shots of a bullwhip and a gunshot are equally potent.' [Leonard Maltin]

1953

Magnificent Obsession [Douglas Sirk] c; spph: David S. Horsley

1953

Sign of the Pagan [Douglas Sirk] cs/c

1954

Naked Alibi [Jerry Hopper] b&w

1954

Four Guns to the Border/Shadow Valley [Richard Carlson] c

1954

Man Without a Star [King Vidor] c

1954

Crashout [Lewis R. Foster] b&w

1954

The Man from Bitter Ridge [Jack Arnold] c

1954

Cult of the Cobra [Francis D. Lyon] b&w

1955

All That Heaven Allows [Douglas Sirk] c

1955

There's Always Tomorrow [Douglas Sirk] b&w

1955

Miracle in the Rain [Rudolph Maté] b&w

1955

Congo Crossing [Joseph Pevney] c; spph: Clifford Stine

1955

Written on the Wind [Douglas Sirk] c; spph: Clifford Stine

1956

Battle Hymn [Douglas Sirk] cs/c; spph: Clifford Stine

1956

Mister Cory [Blake Edwards] cs/c; spph: Clifford Stine

1956

The Midnight Story/Appointment with a Shadow [Joseph Pevney] cs/b&w; spph: Clifford Stine

1956

Man Afraid [Harry Keller] cs/b&w

1956

Man of a Thousand Faces [Joseph Pevney] cs/b&w; spec pfx: Clifford Stine

1957

Touch of Evil/Badge of Evil [Orson Welles & (add scenes) Harry Keller] b&w; 95m, 108m & 111m (restored version 1998); ph add scenes: Clifford Stine

1957

The Female Animal [Harry Keller] cs/b&w; spph: Clifford Stine

1957

A Time to Love and a Time to Die/Will o' the Wisp [Douglas Sirk] cs/c; spph: Clifford Stine

1958

The Thing That Couldn't Die [Will Cowan] b&w; 69m; spph: Clifford Stine

1958

Monster on the Campus/Monster in the Night/Stranger on the Campus [Jack Arnold] b&w; spph: Clifford Stine

1958

Step Down to Terror/The Silent Stranger [Harry Keller] b&w; spph: Clifford Stine

1958

Imitation of Life [Douglas Sirk] c; spph: Clifford Stine

1958

This Earth Is Mine [Henry King] cs/c; spph: Clifford Stine; started by Winton Hoch, but Metty took over when Hoch fell ill

 

 

1959

Spartacus [Stanley Kubrick (replaced Anthony Mann, who started prod with the filming of the slave camp scenes)] str70/c; ph add scenes: Clifford Stine; filmed January-August 1959 & (add scenes) November-December 1959 + January-March 1960

1959

Platinum High School/Rich, Young and Deadly/Trouble at Sixteen [Charles Haas] b&w

1959

Portrait in Black [Michael Gordon] c

1960

Midnight Lace [David Miller] c

1960

The Misfits [John Huston] b&w; 2uc: Rex Wimpy; filmed July-November

1961

By Love Possessed [John Sturges] p/c

1961

Flower Drum Song [Henry Koster] p/c

1961

That Touch of Mink [Delbert Mann] p/c; spec pfx: Albert Whitlock

1962

The Interns [David Swift] b&w

1962

If a Man Answers [Henry Levin] c

1963

Tammy and the Doctor [Harry Keller] c

1963

The Thrill of It All [Norman Jewison] c

1963

Captain Newman, M.D. [David Miller] c; spec pfx: Albert Whitlock

1964

I'd Rather Be Rich [Jack Smight] c

1964

Bus Riley's Back in Town [Harvey Hart] c

1964

The War Lord [Franklin J. Schaffner] p/c; sfx: Albert Whitlock

1965

The Art of Love [Norman Jewison] c

1965

Madame X [David Lowell Rich] c

1966

The Appaloosa/Southwest to Sonora [Sidney J. Furie] ts/c

1966

Texas Across the River [Michael Gordon] ts/c

1966

Thoroughly Modern Millie [George Roy Hill] c

1966

Rough Night in Jericho [Arnold Laven] ts/c

1967

Counterpoint [Ralph Nelson] ts/c

1967

The Secret War of Harry Frigg [Jack Smight] ts/c

1968

Madigan [Don Siegel] ts/c; 'In addition to problems with the producer, Siegel found that cameraman Russell Metty, a man with excellent screen credits, "did not seem particularly interested in the movie." Metty, according to Siegel, spent most of his time at the back of the set or scene listening to a radio. Siegel recalls that, in the scene in which the detectives first trap the killer, [Richard] Widmark lifts a window shade. When Siegel questioned Metty about the scene because the light didn't change when the shade went up. Metty reluctantly arranged for some daylight to come through the window. Once, according to Siegel, when Metty did get up to take a light reading, Inger Stevens, as a joke, looked at him blankly and said, "Who are you?"' [From 'Don Siegel: Director' by Stuart M. Kaminsky, 1974.]

1968

The Pink Jungle [Delbert Mann] ts/c

1969

Eye of the Cat/Wylie [David Lowell Rich] c; cph: Ellsworth Fredericks; new scenes filmed and added in 1971

1969

Change of Habit [William A. Graham] c; first shown on tv

1969

How Do I Love Thee? [Michael Gordon] c

1970

The Omega Man [Boris Sagal] p/c; filmed 1970-71

1971

Cancel My Reservation [Paul Bogart] c

1972

Ben [Phil Karlson] c

1973

That's Entertainment! [Jack Haley Jr.] 35mm (+ 70bu)/b&w-c; mus comp film + doc/134m; co-addph: Gene Polito, Ernest Laszlo, Ennio Guarnieri & Allan Green

1974

Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore [Martin Scorsese] c; ph preliminary tests; ph: Kent L. Wakeford

 

 TELEVISION

1958

Playhouse 90 [ep #69 'The Dungeon' dir by David Swift] 134-part dramatic anthology series/b&w, 1956-60 (CBS-tv); 2nd season, 1957-58

1958

Steve Canyon [ep #18 'The Prisoner' dir by Lamont Johnson] 34-part adventure series/b&w, 1958-59 (NBC-tv); other ph: Arthur Arling (16 ep), Philip Lathrop (11 ep), Kenneth Peach (3 ep), Maury Gertsman (2 ep) & Paul Ivano (pilot)

1958

Alcoa Presents: One Step Beyond [ep #1 'The Bride Possessed' dir by John Newland] 95-part occult anthology series/b&w, 1959-61 (ABC-tv)

1964

Broadside [ep #1 'Don't Make Waves' dir by Edward Montagne] 32-part military sitcom series/b&w, 1964-65 (ABC-tv)

1968

Marcus Welby, M.D. [pilot 'A Matter of Humanities' dir by David Lowell Rich] 169-part medical drama series, 1969-76 (ABC-tv)

1970

Tribes/The Soldier Who Declared Peace [Joseph Sargent] tvm; released to theaters outside USA

1970

Maybe I'll Come Home in the Spring/Deadly Desire [Joseph Sargent] tvm

1971

Columbo [ep #3 'Murder by the Book' dir by Steven Spielberg, #4 'Death Lends a Hand' dir by Bernard L. Kowalski, #5 'Dead Weight' dir by Jack Smight, #6 'Suitable for Framing' dir by Hy Averback & #7 'Lady in Waiting' dir by Norman Lloyd] 45-part (including 2 pilots) police drama series, 1968 & 1971-78 (NBC-tv); 1st season (7 ep), 1971-72; other ph: Harry Wolf & Lloyd Ahern

1971

Lock, Stock and Barrel [Jerry Thorpe] tvm; cph: Harry J. May

1971

The Harness [Boris Sagal] tvm

 

 

1972

The Waltons [25 ep (e.g. #2 'The Carnival' dir by Alf Kjellin) dir by various] tvm (1971) + 221-part drama series, 1972-81 (CBS-tv); 1st season (25 ep), 1972-73; series was followed by 6 tvm's (1982, 1993, 1995 & 1997)

1972

Brock's Last Case [David Lowell Rich] pilot; for NBC-tv

1973

The Waltons [17 ep dir by various] 2nd season (25 ep), 1973-74; see 1972

1973

Hawkins [ep #4 'Blood Feud' dir by Paul Wendkos (PW), #5 'Murder in the Slave Trade' dir by PW & #6 'Murder on the Thirteenth Floor' dir by Jud Taylor] 7-part mystery series, 1973-74 (CBS-tv)

1974

The Waltons [16 ep dir by various] 3rd season (25 ep), 1974-75; see 1972

1975

The Runaways [Harry Harris] tvm

1975

Rich Man, Poor Man [- Book I] [ep #3-6 dir by Boris Sagal & #7-8 dir by David Greene] 8-part miniseries, 1976; other ph: Howard Schwartz (ep #1-2 dir by D. Greene)

1975

Mallory: Circumstantial Evidence [Boris Sagal] pilot; for NBC-tv

1976

Delvecchio [ep #4 'Good Cop' dir by Richard Michaels (RM), #11 'Red Is the Color of My True Love's Hair' dir by Walter Donoger, #12 'APB: Santa Claus' dir by Arnold Laven (AL), #16 'Licensed to Kill' dir by AL & #17-18 'The Madness Within' dir by RM] 2hr pilot + 21-part police drama series, 1976-77 (CBS-tv)

1976

The Hardy Boys Mysteries/The Hardy Boys-Nancy Drew Mysteries (title in  February 1978)/The Hardy Boys (title in fall 1978) [ep #7 'The Flickering Torch Mystery' dir by Ivan Dixon] 46-part adventure series, 1977-79 (ABC-tv); 1st season, 1977

 

 FILMS AS 2ND CAMERAMAN & CAMERA OPERATOR

1931

Public Defender/Million Dollar Swindle/The Reckoner [J. Walter Ruben] co-2nd cam; ph: Edward Cronjager

1931

Secret Service [J. Walter Ruben] co-2nd cam; ph: Edward Cronjager

1931

Girl Crazy [William A. Seiter & (retakes) Norman Taurog] co-c.op; ph: J. Roy Hunt

1932

Symphony of Six Million/Melody of Life [Gregory La Cava] co-c.op; ph: Leo Tover

1932

State's Attorney/Cardigan's Last Case [George Archainbaud] co-c.op; ph: Leo Tover

1932

Is My Face Red? [William A. Seiter] co-c.op; ph: Leo Tover

1932

The Most Dangerous Game/The Hounds of Zaroff/Skull Island [Ernest B. Schoedsack & Irving Pichel] co-c.op; ph: Henry Gerrard

1932

The Penguin Pool Murder/The Penguin Pool Mystery [George Archainbaud] c.op; ph: Henry Gerrard

1932

Lucky Devils [Ralph Ince] c.op; ph: J. Roy Hunt

1933

Morning Glory [Lowell Sherman] c.op; ph: Bert Glennon

1933

One Man's Journey [John S. Robertson] c.op; ph: Jack MacKenzie

1933

The Bowery [Raoul Walsh] co-2nd cam; ph: Barney McGill

1933

The Lost Patrol [John Ford] co-c.op; ph: Harold Wenstrom

1934

His Greatest Gamble [John S. Robertson] c.op; ph: Ted Tetzlaff

1935

Laddie [ George Stevens] 2nd cam; ph: Harold Wenstrom

1935

Sylvia Scarlett [George Cukor] c.op; ph: Joseph H. August