GREAT CINEMATOGRAPHERS


#2: 1923

 

   


KARL STRUSS

 

Born: 30 November 1886, New York City, N.Y., USA, as Karl Fischer Struss, son of Henry Struss Jr., a textile manufacturer of German descent.

Died: 16 December 1981, Saint John's Hospital, Santa Monica, Calif, USA.

Education: DeWitt Clinton High School, New York; Columbia University, New York [1908-12; night classes Art Photography].

Career: At the age of 17 he left his father's bonnet-wire factory to pursue his interest in photography. He studied with Clarence H. White at Columbia University. In 1909, he invented the Struss Lens or Struss Pictorial Lens, a soft-focus lens that proved immensely popular with other photographers of the period. This lens was adopted for cinematography in 1914. His reputation was established when Alfred Stieglitz selected his work for the 1910 International Exhibition of Pictorial Photography at the Albright Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, and then published eight of his photogravures in the April 1912 issue of Camera Work. In that same year he became a member of Stieglitz's Photo-Secession. In 1914, he was asked to shoot for four months for the Bermuda Trade Development Board's illustrated booklet Bermuda: Nature’s Fairyland. During the first week he ran out of film because he was experimenting with a movie camera that also took still images. Luckily there was a motion picture company in Bermuda. Charles Rosher was a renowned London photographer who had made the transition to motion pictures and who gave him some 'short ends', leftover footage, so he could continue shooting. In 1914, he took over Clarence White's studio on West 31st Street. From then until 1917 he established himself as a commercial photographer with clients such as Vogue, Vanity Fair and Harper’s Bazaar. In 1916, he co-founded the Pictorialist Photographers of America [PPA], which became responsible for promoting Pictorialism through traveling exhibitions, workshops, lectures and the encouragement of museums to purchase photographs.

 

#1: Lower Broadway [1911] - Platinum print [Lee Gallery]

#2: Untitled [1917] - [Silverstein Photography]

 

When the United States finally joined WWI, Struss was keen to enlist. But this was not to be as the authorities were made aware of a few conversations at the outset of the war in which he voiced a pro-German sentiment. The damning information given to the authorities came from other members of the PPA. In 1918 he was asked to resign from the PPA and was struck from their membership. However, he vigorously defended his patriotism but still spent time at Fort Leavenworth, as a guard. His studio closed, clients vanished and his reputation damaged, he was disillusioned with New York and realized that it would be difficult to re-establish himself as a photographer. He therefore decided to go straight to Los Angeles in 1919 as soon as he was discharged from the army. He became still photographer for director Cecil B. DeMille. Being trained as an artist-photographer enabled him to quickly stand out in the field. He soon turned from still photography to cinematography and would become one of the first generation of artistic cinematographers. Worked for prod B.P. Schulberg and dir D.W. Griffith [1927-30]. Became contract doph at Paramount in 1931. When the Stereo-Realist Camera [3-D still photography] came on the market in 1947, he was an early enthusiast and he became one of the first members of the Stereo Division of the Photographic Society of America [PSA] when it was formed in 1952. He was also a charter member of the Stereo Club of Southern California [SCSC] in 1956. He was active in many PSA, SCSC and other international stereo slide competitions until 1965. He garnered many acceptances for his stereo slides in the PSA Hollywood International Salon and numerous Honorable Mentions in PSA International Exhibitions. In the 1965 Rochester International Stereo Salon, he garnered acceptances, for 'Anthony and Cleopatra' [featuring Sophia Loren in a behind-the-scenes shot that he had made while filming her in Italy], 'Distant Bellagio' and 'Varenna Moonlight'. He had photographed these images with his Stereo-Realist camera while working on location in Italy in 1953 and 1954 as a director of photography on four feature films, three of which were in 3-D.

Ph commercials.

Was a member of the ASC [nominated by doph Charles Rosher after the release of 'Sunrise'].

Publications: 'Karl Struss, Man with a Camera: The Artist-Photographer in New York and Hollywood' [1976, Karl Struss, Susan & John Harvith], 'Five American Cinematographers. Interviews with Karl Struss, Joseph Ruttenberg, James Wong Howe, Linwood Dunn & William H. Clothier' [1987, Scott Eyman] & 'New York to Hollywood: The Photography of Karl Struss' [1995, Barbara McCandless, Bonnie Yochelson & Richard Koszarski].

For some of Struss' photographs visit the Luminous-Lint website.

Awards: 'Oscar' AA [1927/8; shared] for 'Sunrise'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1927/8] for 'Drums of Love'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1931/2] for 'Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1932/3] for 'Sign of the Cross'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1941; color; shared] for 'Aloma of the South Seas'; Cannes Festival Award [1959] for commercials; Cannes Festival Award [1960] for commercials.



'As a young man, Karl Struss earned himself a niche in the history of early 20th-century photography, but he spent the rest of his life working as a Hollywood cinematographer. In New York before World War I, Struss the photographer embraced Pictorialism, the late 19th-century esthetic that favored expression over depiction, and he joined Alfred Stieglitz's Photo-Secession.

In typical Pictorialist fashion, Struss used soft-focus lenses and elaborate printing techniques to create poetically blurry images. But he did not surrender completely to the vaporous romance that often characterizes the style. His rigorously composed views of the city are animated by the tension between timeless reverie and modern urgencies that would soon render Pictorialism obsolete.

This exhibition presents 33 small platinum prints that Struss himself had assembled into an album for a woman named Amy Whittemore in 1911. Despite their tiny size [all measure about 3.5 by 4.5 inches or less], the pictures are richly atmospheric. There's a Piranesian splendor in ''Chatham Square,'' at the center of which a sun-splashed elevated train plunges into the dark forest of high-rise buildings. In a shadowy view of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, shot from the 110th Street subway stop, you feel both dreamy ethereality and the damp reality of a rainy afternoon in the city.' [Ken Johnson in The New York Times, 27 February 1998.]


 

 FILMS [1 reel = c. 10m]

1920

Something to Think About [Cecil B. DeMille] b&w; cph: Alvin Wyckoff; prod Famous Players-Lasky Film Corporation (FPLFC)

1921

The Affairs of Anatol/A Prodigal Knight [Cecil B. DeMille] b&w; cph: Alvin Wyckoff; prod FPLFC

1921

The Law and the Woman [Penrhyn Stanlaws] b&w; prod FPLFC

1921

Fool's Paradise [Cecil B. DeMille] b&w; cph: Alvin Wyckoff; prod FPLFC

1921

Saturday Night [Cecil B. DeMille] b&w; cph: Alvin Wyckoff; prod FPLFC

1922

Fools First [Marshall Neilan] b&w; 6 reels; cph: David Kesson; prod Marshall Neilan Productions (MNP)

1922

Rich Men's Wives [Louis J. Gasnier] b&w; prod Preferred Pictures

1922

Minnie [Marshall Neilan & Frank Urson] b&w; cph: David Kesson; prod MNP

1922

Thorns and Orange Blossoms [Louis J. Gasnier] b&w; prod Preferred Pictures

1922

The Hero [Louis J. Gasnier] b&w; prod Preferred Pictures

1922

Poor Men's Wives [Louis J. Gasnier] b&w; prod Preferred Pictures

1923

Daughters of the Rich [Louis J. Gasnier] b&w; 6 reels; prod B.P. Schulberg Productions (BPS)

1923

Mothers-in-Law [Louis J. Gasnier] b&w; prod BPS

1923

Maytime [Louis J. Gasnier] b&w; prod BPS

1924

Poisoned Paradise [: The Forbidden Story of Monte Carlo] [Louis J. Gasnier] b&w; prod Preferred Pictures

1924

Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ [Fred Niblo; (uncred) Charles Brabin, Christy Cabanne, J.J. Cohn, Ferdinand Earle & Rex Ingram] b&w + c seq (e.g. Nativity seq) + tinted; worked for 3 months in Rome with dir Christy Cabanne + ph scene of the lepers and scenes in the streets of Jerusalem in Hollywood; cph: René Guissart, Percy Hilburn & Clyde De Vinna; addph: E. Burton Steene, John Boyle, D.W. Martinelli & George Meehan; 2uc: Paul Ivano; trick ph: Paul Eagler; filmed October 1923-June 1924 (in Rome dir by Charles Brabin), from August 1924 in Rome (dir by Fred Niblo) and from spring 1925 in Hollywood; the chariot race (dir by Reeves Eason) was filmed June-August 1925; prod MGM

('Struss was called to MGM in 1924 by Irving Thalberg to interview for 'Ben-Hur' but he did not get the assignment. The picture began filming in Italy, quickly got into trouble and experienced severe cost over-runs, constant strikes and fights between fascists and anti-fascists with Mussolini acting as spoiler. The problems warranted the new studio head L.B. Mayer's going to Rome. Mayer sent for Struss and director Christy Cabanne. Once there, they were told that the current director, Fred Niblo, was staying on and the French cinematographer, René Guissart, was taking over as principal cinematographer. Cabanne and Struss remained in Rome for extra camera and 2u work. But eventually the picture was shut down in January, 1925 and was returned to Hollywood. Struss photographed many sequences that were to be re-shot, including that of the healing of the lepers. This sequence utilized an in-camera effect that Struss devised; he used green make-up on the actors, filming the scene with a red filter in the camera matte box, causing the skin to photograph black. He then slowly slid a green filter of the same density across the lens, replacing the red one as the camera continued to roll; it made the make-up photograph pale, as if the lepers were miraculously cleansed. All the knowledge of filters and mattes that Struss had acquired in his New York days served him to great advantage in Hollywood. Struss bridled at his second-place credit on 'Ben-Hur'. He said he had shot at least 50% of the finished film; Guissart got top billing only because he had a first place clause in his contract that Struss did not know about. Struss photographed many of the two-color Technicolor sequences for the film.' - John Bailey on the ASC website, 2009.)

1924

The Legend of Hollywood [Renaud Hoffman] b&w; 6 reels; prod Charles R. Rogers Productions

1924

White Man [Louis J. Gasnier] b&w; prod BPS

1924

Idle Tongues [Lambert Hillyer] b&w; 6 reels; prod Thomas H. Ince Corporation

1925

The Winding Stair [John Griffith Wray] b&w + tinted seq; 6 reels; prod Fox Film Corporation (FFC)

1926

Hell's 400/Just and Unjust [John Griffith Wray] b&w + c seq (dream seq); 6 reels; prod FFC

1926

Meet the Prince [Joseph Henabery] b&w; 6 reels; prod Metropolitan Pictures Corporation

1926

Forever After [F. Harmon Weight] b&w; prod First National Pictures (FN)

 

[Top right] with dir F.W. Murnau [left] - "Sunrise"

 

1926

Sunrise [: A Song of Two Humans] [F.W. Murnau] b&w; 9 reels; cph: Charles Rosher; silent & sound (music + sound efx) versions; original negative was destroyed in a fire in 1937; filmed 1926-27; prod FFC; 'One of the opening shots was in a village at sundown. We showed lights coming out of doorways; to achieve the effect of interior light coming out and the twilight, the soft light around it, we had to work without exposure meters; there weren't any then! Today it's all mechanized; then we were artists.' *

1927

Babe Comes Home [Ted Wilde] b&w; 6 reels; prod FN

 

[Right/standing behind camera] with dir D.W. Griffith [sitting/hat] - "Drums of Love"

 

1927

Drums of Love/Sentimental Tommy [D.W. Griffith] b&w; c.asst: Billy Bitzer & Harry Jackson; prod United Artists

1928

The Night Watch [Alexander Korda] b&w; with sound efx & music; prod FN

1928

The Battle of the Sexes [D.W. Griffith] b&w; cph: Billy Bitzer (K. Struss claims sole credit); with sound efx & music; prod Art Cinema Corporation

1928

Lady of the Pavements/Lady of the Night [D.W. Griffith] b&w; cph: Billy Bitzer; silent & sound (talking & singing seq) versions; prod Art Cinema Corporation

('This was Struss' last silent picture and it incorporates some of his most glamorous lighting effects. The two women stars, Jetta Goudal and Lupe Velez, are luminous. It was for the latter actress that he developed the 'Lupe Light', a soft-frost bulb in a reflector on a movable arm, positioned below camera. It provided a shadow-less fill and eye-light a decade before Lucien Ballard's 'Obie Light'' - John Bailey on the ASC website, 2009)

 

"Coquette"

 

1928

Coquette [Sam Taylor] b&w; replaced original doph Charles Rosher

('Mary Pickford was always much involved in the pre-production elements of her movies. 'Coquette', her first sound film, presented new challenges because of the space requirements of the sound department. When [doph] Charles Rosher saw how his lighting space was going to be severely restricted, even compromised, he said he could not photograph Pickford as he needed to. She wouldn't accept this, terminated their long-standing alliance - and asked Struss, who had been on 'Sparrows' [1925], to take over. I can find no record of how this came down, and what effect it had on the Rosher/Struss relationship that had begun over fifteen years earlier in Bermuda. This is what Rosher told Brownlow: "I expressed myself freely, and as a result my career with Pickford came to an end… I took no part in the production." He does not mention Karl Struss. Since his earliest days in Hollywood, Struss had a reputation for technical innovation and flexibility; after 'Sunrise' he must have felt his time had finally arrived. Technical flexibility was a quality demanded for 'Coquette'. Struss used up to four cameras, much in the style of the DeMille days with Wyckoff a decade earlier. Pickford received a Best Actress 'Oscar' for her performance in this film. Struss' relationship with Pickford must have been mutually rewarding since he photographed three of her sound films.' - John Bailey on the ASC website, 2009)

1929

The Taming of the Shrew [Sam Taylor] b&w; 68m

1929

Lummox [Herbert Brenon] b&w

1930

Be Yourself! [Thornton Freeland] b&w; cph: Robert Planck

1930

The Bad One [George Fitzmaurice] b&w

1930

One Romantic Night [Paul L. Stein] b&w

1930

[D.W. Griffith's] Abraham Lincoln [D.W. Griffith] b&w

1930

Danger Lights [George B. Seitz] Natural Vision (63,5mm/6perf) & 35mm/b&w; uncred cph: John W. Boyle; pfx: Lloyd Knechtel

1930

Zampa [Eugene Forde] b&w; mus short/10m

1931

Kiki [Samuel Taylor] b&w

1931

Skippy [Norman Taurog] b&w

1931

Up Pops the Devil [A. Edward Sutherland] b&w

1931

Women Love Once [Edward Goodman] b&w

1931

Murder by the Clock [Edward Sloman] b&w

1931

The Road to Reno [Richard Wallace] b&w

 

 

1931

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde [Rouben Mamoulian] b&w; see photos above

("Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde' was a technical tour de force. There are spectacular moving camera shots, starting with the opening scene that runs four minutes and which is shot from Jekyll’s POV. The transformation scenes from Jekyll to Hyde and back to Jekyll exploited smart in-camera effects done with filter changes, reversing the filter sequence of the healing of the lepers scene from 'Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ'. The new KODAK higher speed panchromatic stock made these effects even more possible; it was the reason Struss had abandoned his beloved Dupont stock, for which he had done many testimonial ads.' - John Bailey on the ASC website, 2009)

1932

Two Kinds of Women [William C. de Mille] b&w

1932

Dancers in the Dark [David Burton] b&w

1932

The World and the Flesh [John Cromwell] b&w

1932

Forgotten Commandments [Louis Gasnier & William Schorr] b&w; 65m; incl footage (tinted) from 'The Ten Commandments' (1923, Cecil B. DeMille; ph: Bert Glennon, J. Peverell Marley, a.o.)

1932

The Man from Yesterday [Berthold Viertel] b&w

1932

Guilty as Hell/Guilty as Charged [Erle C. Kenton] b&w

 

Cecil B. DeMille, KS, Fredric March & Elissa Landi - "The Sign of the Cross"

 

1932

The Sign of the Cross [Cecil B. DeMille] b&w; re-issued in 1944 with added prologue; 'I shot the whole black and white picture through bright red gauze. That goat's-milk bath scene was horrible to shoot. It got sour after we had been shooting it for a while, oh boy, it smelled to heaven! It was there for a week. Claudette was really nude, so she couldn't get out too often. She suffered!' *

1932

Island of Lost Souls [Erle C. Kenton] b&w

1932

Tonight Is Ours [Stuart Walker & (assoc dir) Mitchell Leisen] b&w

1933

The Woman Accused [Paul Sloane] b&w

1933

The Story of Temple Drake [Stephen Roberts] b&w

1933

The Girl in 419 [Alexander Hall & George Somnes] b&w; 62m

1933

Disgraced! [Erle C. Kenton] b&w; 63m

1933

One Sunday Afternoon [Stephen Roberts] b&w; uncred cph; ph: Victor Milner; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1933

Torch Singer/Broadway Singer [Alexander Hall & George Somnes] b&w

1933

Four Frightened People [Cecil B. DeMille] b&w

1934

Belle of the Nineties [Leo McCarey] b&w

1934

The Pursuit of Happiness [Alexander Hall] b&w

1934

Here Is My Heart [Frank Tuttle] b&w

1934

Goin' to Town [Alexander Hall] b&w; spec pfx: Dewey Wrigley

1935

Mississippi [A. Edward Sutherland & (uncred fill-in) Wesley Ruggles] started the film, but was replaced by Charles Lang

1935

Two for Tonight [Frank Tuttle] b&w; 61m

1935

Anything Goes/Tops Is the Limit [Lewis Milestone] b&w; spec pfx: Farciot Edouart

1935

Preview Murder Mystery [Robert Florey] b&w; 60m

1936

Too Many Parents [Robert F. McGowan] b&w

1936

Rhythm on the Range [Norman Taurog] b&w; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings & Dev Jennings

1936

Hollywood Boulevard [Robert Florey] b&w; uncred cph: George T. Clemens

1936

Go West Young Man [Henry Hathaway] b&w

1936

Let's Make a Million [Ray McCarey] b&w; 61m

1936

Waikiki Wedding [Frank Tuttle] b&w; spec pfx: Farciot Edouart

1937

Mountain Music [Robert Florey (replaced Charles Riesner after 2 weeks)] b&w

 

[Left/tie] with dir Theodore Reed [sitting] and actors Bing Crosby & Mary Carlisle

"Double or Nothing"

 

1937

Double or Nothing [Theodore Reed] b&w

1937

Thunder Trail/Thunder Pass [Charles Barton] b&w; 58m

1937

Every Day's a Holiday [A. Edward Sutherland] b&w; spec pfx: Gordon Jennings

1937

Dangerous to Know [Robert Florey] b&w; uncred cph; ph: Theodor Sparkuhl

1938

Sing You Sinners [Wesley Ruggles] b&w

1938

Paris Honeymoon [Frank Tuttle] b&w

1938

Thanks for the Memory [George Archainbaud] b&w

1938

Zenobia/Elephants Never Forget/It's Spring Again [Gordon Douglas] b&w; pfx: Roy Seawright

1939

Some Like It Hot/Rhythm Romance [George Archainbaud] b&w; 64m

1939

Island of Lost Men [Kurt Neumann] b&w; 68m

1939

The Star Maker [Roy Del Ruth] b&w

1939

Gone With the Wind [Victor Fleming (replaced George Cukor); (add dir) Sam Wood (fill-in), Sidney Franklin & William Wellman] c; ph Technicolor tests (1936 ?) & retakes (1939); ph: Ernest Haller

1939

The Great Dictator [Charles Chaplin] b&w; cph: Roland Totheroh; filmed September 1939-February 1940

1941

Caught in the Draft [David Butler] b&w; uncred cph (replaced by Struss): Charles Schoenbaum

1941

Aloma of the South Seas [Alfred Santell] c; assoc ph: Wilfred M. Cline & William Snyder; optical ph: Paul K. Lerpae

 

 

1942

Journey Into Fear [Norman Foster & (uncred) Orson Welles] b&w; sfx ph: Vernon L. Walker; 'We did one scene that took forty-nine takes, after midnight, just a tiny shot of Welles and his shadow at the bottom of a gangplank, then he climbs it and goes on to the ship. No one could really say whether take forty-nine was any better than take one. It was all so extravagant and crazy!' *

1942

Happy Go Lucky [Curtis Bernhardt] c; cph: Wilfred Cline; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1943

Riding High/Melody Inn [George Marshall] c; cph: Harry Hallenberger; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1943

And the Angels Sing [George Marshall] b&w

1943

Frenchman's Creek [Mitchell Leisen] c; uncred 3uc; ph: George Barnes

1943

Rainbow Island [Ralph Murphy & (uncred; started the film) Frank Tuttle] c; sfx ph: Gordon Jennings; process ph: Farciot Edouart

1944

Bring on the Girls [Sidney Lanfield] c

1944

Fun Time [William Shea] c; short/20m; ep series 'Musical Parade'

1944

Wonder Man [Bruce Humberstone] c; uncred cph (started the film, but prod was suspended for a while after Danny Kaye injured his leg); ph: Victor Milner & William Snyder

1945

Tarzan and the Leopard Woman [Kurt Neumann] b&w; 10th film in Johnny Weissmuller's 12-part 'Tarzan'-series (MGM, 1931-42 & RKO, 1943-48)

1945

Suspense [Frank Tuttle] b&w

1946

Mr. Ace [Edwin L. Marin] b&w

1946

The Macomber Affair/The Great White Hunter [Zoltan Korda] b&w; Africa ph: Osmond Borradaile, John Wilcox & Freddie Francis

1946

Heaven Only Knows/Montana Mike [Albert S. Rogell] b&w; spec pfx: Ray Binger & Rocky Cline

1947

Siren of Atlantis [Gregg Tallas (cred as dir, but was the film editor); (uncred) Arthur Ripley (dir the original film) & John Brahm (add scenes in June 1948)] b&w

1947

Call of the Forest [John F. Link Sr.] c; 56m

1947

The Dude Goes West [Kurt Neumann] b&w

1948

Tarzan's Magic Fountain/Tarzan and the Arrow of Death [Lee Sholem] b&w; 1st film in Lex Barker's 5-part 'Tarzan'-series (RKO, 1948-53)

1948

Bad Boy/The Story of Danny Lester [Kurt Neumann] b&w

1949

Hello Out There [James Whale] b&w; short/41m

1949

It's a Small World [William Castle] b&w; 69m

1950

Rocketship X-M/Expedition Moon [Kurt Neumann] b&w + tinted (scenes on Mars); spec pfx des: Jack Rabin

1950

The Return of Jesse James [Arthur Hilton] b&w

1950

The Texan Meets Calamity Jane/Calamity Jane and the Texan [Ande Lamb] c

1950

Father's Wild Game [Herbert I. Leeds] b&w; 61m

1950

Tarzan's Peril/[Tarzan and the] Jungle Queen/Tarzan's Mate in Peril [Byron Haskin] b&w (originally shot in color); Africa ph (July-September): Jack Whitehead; 3rd film in Lex Barker's 5-part 'Tarzan'-series

1951

Face to Face [John Brahm (seg 'The Secret Sharer') & Bretaigne Windust (seg 'The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky')] b&w; 2 seg; ph seg 'The Secret Sharer'; ph seg 'The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky': George E. Diskant

 

With prod/actor James Mason [right]

"Lady Possessed"

 

1951

Lady Possessed [William Spier (in USA) & Roy Kellino (in UK)] b&w; ph UK seq (in Summer 1950): Derek Williams

1951

Rose of Cimarron [Harry Keller] c

 

 

1951

Mesa of Lost Women/Lost Women of Zarpa [Herbert Tevos (dir original film) & Ron Ormond (add scenes)] b&w; 69m; cph (ph add scenes): Gilbert Warrenton; filmed in 1951 as 'Tarantula'; Ron Ormond dir add scenes in July 1952 and the film was re-titled

1951

Tarzan's Savage Fury/Tarzan, the Hunted [Cy Endfield] b&w; 4th film in Lex Barker's 5-part 'Tarzan'-series

1951

Limelight [Charles Chaplin] b&w; 'They did start out with Rollie Totheroh and a top crew, but Rollie still didn't know how to light. So they called me in.' *

1952

Tarzan and the She-Devil [Kurt Neumann] b&w; 5th film in Lex Barker's 5-part 'Tarzan'-series

1953

The 3-D Follies [William Cameron Menzies, Lester Horton, a.o.] Stereo Cine 3-D/c; 6 seg; ph seg 'Carmenesque'; other ph: John Boyle, a.o.; unfinished & unreleased

1953

Un Turco napoletano/Neapolitan Turk [Mario Mattòli] 3-D/c; cph: Riccardo Pallottini

1953

Il più comico spettacolo del mondo/Funniest Show on Earth [Mario Mattòli] 3-D/c; cph: Fernando Risi & Riccardo Pallottini

1953

Cavalleria rusticana/Fatal Desire [Carmine Gallone] 3-D/c; cph: Riccardo Pallottini

1953

Due notti con Cleopatra/Two Nights with Cleopatra [Mario Mattòli] c; cph: Riccardo Pallottini

1954

Attila [, flagello di Dio]/Attila the Hun [Pietro Francisci] c; cph: Aldo Tonti; addph: Riccardo Pallottini, Giuseppe Rotunno & Luciano Trasatti

1954

Miseria e nobiltà/Poverty and Nobility [Mario Mattòli] c; cph: Luciano Trasatti

1955

Mohawk [: A Legend of the Iroquois] [Kurt Neumann] c

1956

She Devil [Kurt Neumann] Regalscope/b&w

 

 

1957

Kronos [Kurt Neumann] Regalscope/b&w; click here

1957

The Deerslayer [Kurt Neumann] cs/c

1957

The Hot Angel [Joe Parker] b&w; aph: Elmer G. Dyer

1957

The Rawhide Trail [Robert Gordon] b&w; 67m

1957

Counterplot [Kurt Neumann] b&w; released in 1959

1957

Machete [Kurt Neumann] b&w

1958

The Fly [Kurt Neumann] cs/c; spec pfx: L.B. Abbott; ''The Fly' was just plain ridiculous. There was one scene there which I told the director, Kurt Neumann, was crazy. They had the figure of a man reduced to the size of a fly, and the fly talked. And they made the man say, 'Help me, help me!' in a tiny voice. Oh, gee!' *

1958

The Sad Horse [James B. Clark] cs/c

1959

The Rebel Set/Beatsville [Gene Fowler Jr.] b&w

1959

Here Come the Jets [Gene Fowler Jr.] Regalscope/b&w; aph: Kay Norton

1959

The Alligator People [Roy Del Ruth] cs/b&w

* From interview in 'Hollywood Cameramen' by Charles Higham, 1970

 

 TELEVISION

1955

Cavalcade of America/DuPont Presents the Cavalcade Theatre [ep 'Barbed Wire Christmas' dir by Robert Stevenson] anthology series/b&w, 1952-57; 4th season (ep #10)

1955

My Friend Flicka [ep #4 'A Good Deed' dir by Frederick Stephani (FS), #5 'Cavalry Horse' dir by FS, #6 'The Accident' dir by FS, #9 'Rogue Stallion' dir by Nathan Juran (NJ), #10 'The Little Secret' dir by NJ, #12 'The Silver Saddle' dir by John English (JE), #14 'The Little Visitor' dir by FS, #15 'The Golden Promise' dir by JE, #16 'Black Dust' dir by JE, #17 'The Night Rider' dir by Robert Gordon (RG), #18 'The Settler' dir by RG, #19 'Wind from Heaven' dir by RG, #20 'The Whip' dir by James B. Clark, #21 'The Runaways' dir by JE, #22 'The Cameraman' dir by JE, #23 'Old Danny' dir by JE, #24 'Rough and Ready' dir by JE, #25 'The Royal Carriage' dir by JE, #26 'Mister Goblin' dir by JE, #27 'Rebels in Hiding' dir by Donald McDougall, #28 'Lock, Stock and Barrel' dir by JE, #29 'The Unmasking' dir by Albert S. Rogell (ASR), #30 'Refuge for the Night' dir by RG, #31 'Against All Odds' dir by JE, #32 'The Old Champ' dir by JE, #33 'The Medicine Man' dir by JE, #34 'When the Bugle Blows/When Bugles Blow' dir by JE, #35 'The Recluse' dir by JE, #36 'The Foundlings' dir by JE, #37 'Growing Pains' dir by ASR, #38 'The Lost River' dir by RG & #39 'Big Red' dir by JE] 39-part series, 1956-57; filmed in color, but aired in b&w on CBS-tv (reruns in color on NBC-tv, 1957-58); other ph: Clark Ramsey, Joseph Biroc, Lloyd Ahern, Joseph LaShelle (pilot), a.o.; filmed September 1955-June 1956; first filmed series from 20th Century-Fox

1956

The 20th Century-Fox Hour/Hour of Stars [ep #19 'Child of the Regiment' dir by Lewis Allen] 37-part series, 1955-57/b&w; 2nd season, 1956-57; other ph: Charles Van Enger, Edwin DuPar, Frank Redman & Lloyd Ahern

1956

Broken Arrow [ep #1 'The Mail Riders' dir by Alvin Ganzer, ep #2 'Battle at Apache Pass' dir by Richard L. Bare, ep #3 'Indian Agent' dir by RLB, ep #4 'The Captive' dir by RLB, ep #5 'Passage Deferred' dir by John English, ep #6 'Medicine Man' dir by JE, ep #7 'Hermano' dir by Hollingsworth Morse, ep #8 'Justice/Caged' dir by JE, ep #9 'Return from the Shadows' dir by HM, ep #10 'Cry Wolf' dir by William Thiele, ep #11 'The Conspirators' dir by HM, ep #12 'The Raiders' dir by RLB & ep #13 'Apache Massacre' dir by Joe Parker] 72-part series, 1956-58/b&w; 1st season, 1956-57; other ph: Frank Redman, Charles Van Enger, a.o.

 

 MISCELLANEOUS

1919

Male and Female [Cecil B. DeMille] uncred still ph; ph: Alvin Wyckoff; prod Famous Players-Lasky Film Corporation

1925

Sparrows/Human Sparrows [William Beaudine & (finished film) Tom McNamara] 2nd cameraman; ph: Hal Mohr & Charles Rosher; restored tinted version with music released in 1976; prod Pickford Corporation