[Left] with dir David Lean

               

FREDDIE YOUNG

Born: 9 October 1902, Marylebone, London, UK, as Frederick Archibald Young. Also credited as F.A. Young.

Died: 1 December 1998, Kingston on Thames, Surrey, UK.

Career: Entered the film industry in 1917 as a tea boy at the Gaumont Studios in Lime Grove, Shepherd's Bush. He was soon promoted to laboratory assistant. Before WW1, filmmaking was still a primitive art. 'The studios were in a glasshouse to get the light,' recalled Young. 'If a cloud came over the sun, the set would go very dark. It was very crude. We had a few arc lights, but it was what I'd call illumination, not lighting.' In 1918, he developed and hand-printed all 6,000 ft of 'The First Man in the Moon', the first British science fiction film. Later active as c.asst [working for doph Arthur Brown], focus puller, still ph, projectionist and asst film editor. By the time sound came to the cinema, he had already become an outstanding lighting cameraman and had ph his first film, 'The Flag Lieutenant' [1926]. Impressed by this, in 1929 the prod/dir Herbert Wilcox took him under contract to MGM British Studios in Elstree [until 1959], where his jobs included everything from editing to driving the studio car. In 1931, Wilcox gave him 'The Blue Danube' to shoot and, after it proved a success, he ph a number of the costume dramas in which Anna Neagle - Wilcox's wife - provided impersonations of celebrated women, among them 'Nell Gwyn' [1934] and 'Victoria the Great' [1937]. When, at the start of WW2, RKO invited Wilcox and Anna Neagle to Hollywood to make 'Nurse Edith Cavell', Young went with them. Being accustomed to organizing every detail of the cinematography himself, he found the American way of working - where gaffers and focus-pullers expected a measure of independence - not to his liking, and he soon returned to England. From 1942-44 he served as captain and chief cameraman in the Army Kinematograph Service at Wembley Studio. In that capacity he did tests on a film about the Normandy landings [for dir Carol Reed], but this doc/training film was unrealized. Ph and directed one ep of a series of 'Tank Tactics'-films for training purposes. After 1959, Young was able to slip the shackles of MGM and realized his ambition of becoming a freelance director of photography.

Ph commercials for British Rail, a.o.

Directed the tvm 'Arthur's Hallowed Ground' [ph: Chic Anstiss] in May 1983.

Was co-founder of the BSC in 1949 and became its first president [1949-52]. Was also BSC president from 1957-60. Was member of the ASC and Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society [FRPS]. Became Officer of the Order of the British Empire [OBE] in 1970.

Wrote [with Peter Busby] his autobiography 'Seventy Light Years: An Autobiography' [published in 1999].

Appeared in the doc 'Van Gogh: Darkness Into Light' [1955; ph: Henri Persin], ep of the tv-series 'The South Bank Show' [1978] & 'Extraordinary' [1978, Len Lurcuck], the doc 'The Maker and the Process' [1970, Bruce Pittman], ep #5 'Opportunity Lost' & #6 'End of an Era' of the tv-series 'Cinema Europe: The Other Hollywood' [1995, David Gill & Kevin Brownlow] and in ep of the tv-series 'This Is Your Life' [1996] & 'Behind the Camera' [1999].

Awards: 'Oscar' AA nom [1952; color] for 'Ivanhoe'; BSC Award nom [1956] for 'Bhowani Junction' & 'Invitation to the Dance'; 'Oscar' AA [1962; color], BSC Award [1962] & Golden Globe Award [1963] for 'Lawrence of Arabia'; 'Emmy' Award [1963] for 'Macbeth'; BSC Award [1965] for his contribution to the international recognition of British cinematography; 'Oscar' AA [1965; color] & BSC Award [1966] for 'Doctor Zhivago'; BAFTA Film Award nom [1965] for 'The 7th Dawn'; BAFTA Film Award nom [1966] for 'Lord Jim'; BAFTA Film Award nom [1968] for 'The Deadly Affair'; 'Oscar' AA [1970], BSC Award [1970] & BAFTA Film Award nom [1971] for 'Ryan's Daughter'; 'Oscar' AA nom [1971] for 'Nicholas and Alexandra'; 'Emmy' Award nom [1978/9; shared] for 'Ike' [Part 2]; BAFTA Guild Award of Excellence [1980]; ASC International Achievement Award [1993]; AEC Honorary 'Premio Prisma' [1996].



> Go to FILMS


[Right] with David Lean - 'Ryan's Daughter' [1969]

The World's greatest cameraman, by general consent, and winner of no less than three Academy Awards, Freddie Young was one of the last links with the silent era. He had the longest career of any cameraman.

He was born in 1902, and lived in Shepherd's Bush. As a boy, he was fascinated by films, and he and his brother Bill went to the cinema at least twice a week. He also went regularly to the Lime Grove swimming baths. Opposite was a vast greenhouse of a building which aroused Freddie's curiosity. He was told it was a film studio. He thought how marvelous it would be to work in such a romantic place, and he knocked on the door. He was very surprised to be taken on at once.

It was 1917, and most of the workers had gone to France. Freddie himself, at 14 too young to join up, had been doing war work, drilling hand grenades in a munitions factory - a job he hated, and which he quickly abandoned. His first position at the Gaumont Studios was in the laboratory, the best possible training for a cameraman. A year later, he was left entirely in charge of the lab, and he was able to experiment with tinting and toning. By 1919 he was lab manager, and when Gaumont closed the lab he was made assistant cameraman - he did 'all the jobs nobody else felt like doing'. He drove the studio car, took the stills, projected the rushes and even cut the film - in addition to helping the cameraman six days a week and often Sundays as well. During the making of features like 'Rob Roy', he volunteered to do dangerous stunts - falling 50 feet for instance, from a castle wall into a sheet which looked the size of a pocket-handkerchief, held by members of the crew. The director, William Kellino, rewarded him with 10 shillings. Young was as handsome as any leading man and as a young man he looked like a tougher version of Ivor Novello. He doubled Novello in 'The Triumph of the Rat', dodging through the Paris traffic so the company wouldn't have to risk their expensive star. During the Twenties his most ambitious film would have been a version of Lawrence of Arabia which M.A. Wetherell was planning in 1927, but which fell through. However, he had already been on a location trip to the Egyptian desert for 'Fires of Fate' - and he was present when Howard Carter uncovered Tutankhamun's tomb. Back in England, he did a lot of newsreel work and he photographed an elaborate recreation of the Somme in documentary style as well as a feature film set in the last weeks of the Great War, 'Victory'. During the making of 'Victory', Young married Marjorie Gaffney, an assistant director with Victor Saville and Alfred Hitchcock. He worked for Hitchcock on 'Blackmail', doing the elaborate series of dissolves [in the camera] for the montage which opens the picture.

Young subsequently joined Herbert Wilcox. He worked out a system of multiple cameras, rather like the technique used in television, and could complete a talkie in a couple of weeks. He and Wilcox formed a partnership which was to result in some memorable pictures.

He first met director David Lean on 'Major Barbara', which was supposed to be directed by Gabriel Pascal. In fact Lean and Harold French were doing the directing and when Lean gave Freddie some terse instructions, Young replied "Don't teach your grandmother to suck eggs." This stuck in Lean's memory, and years later he was unwilling to use Young for 'Lawrence of Arabia'. When he bowed to the inevitable, however, Young arrived on the location, marched up to Lean and said "Don't teach your grandmother to suck eggs." By this time, Freddie Young had had a far more adventurous life even than David Lean. He had been back to the desert again, directing the second unit on 'Caesar and Cleopatra' - shooting the Egyptian army for Gabriel Pascal - and had crossed the U-boat-infested Atlantic to film Michael Powell's '49th Parallel' in Canada. He spent four months there, traveling 20,000 miles. He was commissioned into the Army Film Production Unit and was blown up by a phosphorous bomb.

Often during the shooting of 'Lawrence of Arabia' he had to drive Lean - lost in thought in his beloved desert - back to the camera. He was nearly 60, but displayed ferocious energy. The company saw virtually no rushes in the desert and the impact of Young's work when they eventually saw it in London was stunning. No shot in his entire career aroused so much comment as the scene when Omar Sharif emerged from a mirage - achieved with a unique telephoto lens he had had the foresight to bring with him from Panavision in America. David Lean and Freddie Young formed a partnership. "He gives you an inspiration," said Young, "so you go out of your depth and try and do something extraordinary." Lean knew there was no need to hover at Young's shoulder. As he wrote to him, years later: "For the most part I will give you a set-up, fiddle around with the props, talk to the actors and go and have a cup of tea. I know a bit about lenses, consider myself rather bright about composition and, at a pinch, make a suggestion or minor criticism about lighting - but on the whole you're a lonely man left to your own devices."

I first met Freddie Young when he was working on 'You Only Live Twice'. I was amazed that in the midst of terrific pressure on a colossal production he took the time to answer my questions with immense enthusiasm and friendliness. In his fascinating memoirs, Freddie Young added a note, in his own hand: "Mind you, I'm 88 years old now and I spend most of my time painting, and I enjoy that enormously. I'm creating pictures with a paintbrush with nobody to interfere with my work. It's marvelous." [From obituary by Kevin Brownlow in The Independent, December 4, 1998.]

Photo Thys Ockersen Archive

With Gina Lollobrigida - "Solomon and Sheba" [1958]

BRITISH CINEMATOGRAPHER TALKS OF HOLLYWOOD

[From article by Fred Young, FRPS, in 'American Cinematographer', July, 1939.]

I have been asked to write something about my impressions, as a representative of Britain's camera profession, of making a picture in Hollywood. The production is by no means completed at this time, but I feel that it has been a privilege and a pleasure to be able to take part in the making of a Hollywood production, and especially to be associated with Joseph August, ASC in photographing Anna Neagle in the Herbert Wilcox-RKO picture 'Nurse Edith Cavell'.

Technical Resources

The dominant impression that a British visitor gets as he works in Hollywood is the - to us - incredible abundance of Hollywood's technical resources. By this, I do not wholly mean equipment or physical facilities, for in England we now have quite a number of studios as well-equipped and nearly as large as those in Hollywood.

We have many excellent directors of photography, sound engineers, art directors, and the like. But we are not so fortunate in our supply of operative camera crews, electricians, studio carpenters, property men and 'grips' to back up the efforts of our key technicians. We have them, but none too abundantly; and as a rule few of them have behind them the long experience of their Hollywood counterparts.

This is in great measure due to the way our industry in England has developed. For a long time it struggled along with little or no encouragement. Then, a few years ago, it suddenly expanded. The expansion was so rapid that it could quite truthfully be called a 'boom', and, like most overly rapid booms, it was followed by a near panic while the industry consolidated its gains.

As a result, we have not been able to offer really consistent employment even to our more experienced technicians, still less to the many less experienced ones.

Crews Break Up

Too often, at home, you will start a picture and, when time comes to assemble the crew you had on your previous film, you will be unable to do so. The operator may have gone to another studio; the young fellow you had just begun to get trained to be a satisfactory assistant will have dropped from sight; and your electrician may have grown discouraged and gone back to his old job outside the industry - where paychecks come more steadily. You will have to start to train a new crew from relative newcomers.

Here in Hollywood it is so different! It seems almost incredible to learn that if any of my American friends finds it for any reason impossible to use his regular crew on a new picture, he can virtually choose blindfolded from the many men available for each job - and find himself with a dependable crew, the youngest of whom will have had 10 or even 20 years of studio experience.

Cameras Scarce

There is one phase in which Hollywood seems definitely ahead of our British studios. This is in the matter of cameras. We use many of the same types of cameras - in most instances Mitchells - though in studios where French or German cinematographers have been active there are Debries, while a few of the smaller plants use the less-expensive, British-built Vintens. But our studios are not nearly so plentifully supplied with cameras as is common in Hollywood.

In Hollywood, if some accident happens to the camera you are using, you can have another one, equally dependable and of identical design, delivered to the set in a matter of minutes. If a scene should require it, you could have 5 or 10 cameras and their crews ready to go on almost as short notice.

In England, we are not so fortunate. In too many cases, a camera mishap or a sudden call for extra cameras can mean exasperating delays to production, simply because the studio is not likely to be equipped with many spares.

American Influence

Much of the general similarity between Hollywood and British studios, methods and equipment can be credited to the influence of several American cinematographers and other technicians who have been active in British production during recent years.

An American art director, Jack Okey, designed and built Denham Studio; other American photographers and technicians have had influence in equipping our studios with the things which Hollywood's years of experience had proved best.

Some of my compatriots have expressed resentment at the activities of American cinematographers and technicians in British studios. I have never been able to justify this attitude. I do not believe that the activities of any of the outstanding Americans who have made pictures in our British studios have kept any comparably capable British technicians out of work.

On the other hand, we have much for which to thank our American fellows. At the time when we were most urgently in need of it, they brought to us the most up-to-date knowledge of methods and materials from the world's greatest production center - knowledge which has played an important part in the last few years' progress in British films.

In addition, their work and the salaries paid them have done much to impress our producers with the value of capable photographers. These salaries, in turn, are bearing fruit in a slow but steady improvement in the compensation paid to British cameramen and their crews.

As compared to American standards, there is still much to be done in this direction; but I feel that the influence of the Americans who have made pictures in British studios has done much to start the ball rolling in the right direction. [See also Joseph Ruttenberg]



 FILMS

1927

Victory [M.A. Wetherell] b&w; 2nd cam: Joe Rosenthal

1928

The Tonic [Ivor Montagu] b&w; short/27m

1928

Daydreams [Ivor Montagu] b&w; short/24m

1928

Blue Bottles [Ivor Montagu] b&w; short/26m

1929

Blackmail [Alfred Hitchcock] b&w; ph montage shots for silent version; ph: Jack Cox

1929

White Cargo [J.B. Williams] b&w; reshot scenes for sound version; ph: Karl Puth or Werner Brandes

1929

The Bondman [Herbert Wilcox] b&w

1929

A Peep Behind the Scenes [Jack Raymond] b&w

1930

Canaries Sometimes Sing [Tom Walls] b&w; cph: Bernard Knowles

1930

On Approval [Tom Walls] b&w

1930

The 'W' Plan [Victor Saville] b&w; cph: René Guissart & Werner Brandes

1930

Plunder [Tom Walls] b&w

1930

Tons of Money [Tom Walls] b&w; cph: Hal Young

1930

Rookery Nook/One Embarrassing Night [Tom Walls & (superv) Byron Haskin] b&w; co-uncred cph; ph: David Kesson

1930

A Warm Corner [Victor Saville] b&w

1930

The Loves of Robert Burns [Herbert Wilcox] b&w; cph: David Kesson

1931

The Sport of Kings [Victor Saville] b&w; cph: Alex Bryce

1931

The Speckled Band [Jack Raymond] b&w

1931

Carnival/Venetian Nights/Dance Pretty Lady [Herbert Wilcox] b&w

1931

The Chance of a Night Time [Herbert Wilcox & Ralph Lynn] b&w

1931

Mischief [Jack Raymond] b&w; 67m

1931

Tilly of Bloomsbury [Jack Raymond] b&w

1931

Up for the Cup [Jack Raymond] b&w

1931

The Blue Danube - A Rhapsody [Herbert Wilcox] b&w; also German version

1931

Good Night, Vienna/Magic Night [Herbert Wilcox] b&w

1932

A Night Like This [Tom Walls] b&w

1932

It's a King! [Jack Raymond] b&w; 67m; cph: Cyril Bristow

1932

Leap Year [Tom Walls] b&w

1932

The Love Contract [Herbert Selpin] b&w; or ph Cyril Bristow

1932

The Mayor's Nest [Maclean Rogers] b&w; or ph Cyril Bristow

1932

Thark [Tom Walls] b&w

1932

Just My Luck [Jack Raymond] b&w

1932

The King's Cup [Herbert Wilcox, Robert J. Cullen, Sir Alan Cobham & Donald McCardle] b&w

1932

Yes, Mr. Brown [Herbert Wilcox & Jack Buchanan] b&w

1933

A Cuckoo in the Nest [Tom Walls] b&w; uncred cph; ph: Glen MacWilliams

1933

The Little Damozel [Herbert Wilcox] b&w

1933

Bitter Sweet [Herbert Wilcox] b&w

1933

Night of the Garter [Jack Raymond] b&w

1933

Summer Lightning [Maclean Rogers] b&w

1933

That's a Good Girl [Jack Buchanan] b&w

1933

Trouble [Maclean Rogers] b&w

1933

Up for the Derby [Maclean Rogers] b&w; or ph Cyril Bristow & C. McDonnell

1934

The Queen's Affair/Runaway Queen [Herbert Wilcox] b&w; ext ph: Sepp Allgeier; spec pfx: Lloyd Knechtel

1934

Girls. Please! [Jack Raymond] b&w; or ph Cyril Bristow

1934

Nell Gwyn [Herbert Wilcox] b&w

1934

The King of Paris [Jack Raymond] b&w

1934

Escape Me Never [Paul Czinner] b&w; Georges Périnal is credited with interior ph and Sepp Algeier with exterior ph; F. Young's role (if any) is unknown

1935

Peg of Old Drury [Herbert Wilcox] b&w

1935

Come Out of the Pantry [Jack Raymond] b&w; cph: Henry Harris

1935

Where's George?/The Hope of His Side [Jack Raymond] b&w

1935

Limelight/Backstage/Street Singer's Serenade [Herbert Wilcox] b&w; cph: Henry Harris

1936

When Knights Were Bold [Jack Raymond] b&w

1936

Two's Company [Tim Whelan] b&w

1936

This'll Make You Whistle [Herbert Wilcox] b&w

[Right] with actress Anna Neagle & dir Herbert Wilcox

1936

The Three Maxims/The Show Goes On [Herbert Wilcox] b&w; also French & German versions shot in Paris, France

1936

Fame [Leslie S. Hiscott] b&w; or ph Henry Harris

1936

Millions [Leslie S. Hiscott] b&w; uncred cph; ph: Francis Carver

1937

The Frog [Jack Raymond] b&w

1937

London Melody/Girl in the Street/Look Out for Love [Herbert Wilcox] b&w

1937

Victoria the Great [Herbert Wilcox] b&w-c; color ph: William V. Skall (1 seq)

1937

The Rat [Jack Raymond] b&w

1937

Sunset in Vienna/Suicide Legion [Norman Walker] b&w

1938

Sixty Glorious Years/Queen of Destiny [Herbert Wilcox] c; cph: William V. Skall

1938

A Royal Divorce [Jack Raymond] b&w

1939

Goodbye, Mr. Chips! [Sam Wood] b&w

1939

Nurse Edith Cavell [Herbert Wilcox] b&w; cph: Joseph H. August

1939

Contraband/Blackout [Michael Powell] b&w

1940

Busman's Honeymoon/Haunted Honeymoon [Arthur Woods (replaced Richard Thorpe after loc filming)] b&w; loc ph started in August 1939; studio ph in March/April 1940

1940

Major Barbara [Gabriel Pascal] b&w; loc ph; ph: Ronald Neame

1940

49th Parallel/The Invaders [Michael Powell] b&w; spec backgrounds: Osmond Borradaile

1941

They Flew Alone/Wings and the Woman [Herbert Wilcox] b&w; ?; ph: Max Greene

1942

The Young Mr. Pitt [Carol Reed] b&w; 2uc: Roy Fogwell

1944

Caesar and Cleopatra [Gabriel Pascal] c; cph: Jack Hildyard & Robert Krasker; ext ph Egypt: Jack Cardiff

1946

Bedelia [Lance Comfort] b&w; spec pfx: Lionel Banes & Cliff Richardson

1946

So Well Remembered [Edward Dmytryk] b&w

1947

While I Live/The Dream of Olwen [John Harlow] b&w

1947

Escape [Joseph L. Mankiewicz] b&w; miniatures ph: Henry Harris

1948

The Winslow Boy [Anthony Asquith] b&w; ext ph: Osmond Borradaile

1948

Edward, My Son [George Cukor] b&w; pfx: Tom Howard

1948

Conspirator [Victor Saville] b&w; pfx: Tom Howard

[With glasses] - c.op Skeets Kelly - Walt Disney - prod Perce Pearce - dir Byron Haskin - "Treasure Island"

1949

Treasure Island [Byron Haskin] c; loc ph: L. Cave-Chinn & Stanley Sayer

1950

Calling Bulldog Drummond [Victor Saville] b&w; spec pfx: Tom Howard

1951

Giselle [Henry Caldwell] b&w; ballet film/31m

1951

Ivanhoe [Richard Thorpe] c; addph: Stephen Dade; spec pfx: Tom Howard

1952

Million Dollar Mermaid/The One-Piece Bathing Suit [Mervyn LeRoy] c; insert ph River Thames; ph: George Folsey

1952

Time Bomb/Terror on a Train [Ted Tetzlaff] b&w

[Left] with Gene Kelly - "Invitation to the Dance"

1952

Invitation to the Dance [Gene Kelly] c; ph (in UK) seq 'Circus', 'Ring Around the Rosy' & (deleted) 'Dance Me a Song'; seq 'Sinbad the Sailor' ph (in Hollywood in February 1953) by Joseph Ruttenberg; released in 1957

1952

Mogambo [John Ford] c; cph: Robert Surtees; addph: Stephen Dade; gorilla ph: Jack Whitehead

1953

Knights of the Round Table [Richard Thorpe] cs/c; cph: Stephen Dade; pfx: Tom Howard; first MGM prod in CinemaScope

1953

Betrayed/The True and the Brave [Gottfried Reinhardt] c; 2uc: Skeets Kelly

1954

Bedevilled [Mitchell Leisen & (uncred fill-in while M. Leisen was ill) Richard Thorpe] cs/c

1955

Bhowani Junction [George Cukor] cs/c; addph: Stephen Dade; spec pfx: Tom Howard

1955

Lust for Life [Vincente Minnelli & (uncred 1 scene) George Cukor] cs/c; cph: Russell Harlan; spec ph: John Arnold

1956

Beyond Mombasa [George Marshall] c

[Right] with John Ford [left] and actor Cyril Cusack

"The Rising of the Moon"

1956

The Rising of the Moon [John Ford] b&w; 3 seg; uncred cph; ph: Robert Krasker

1956

The Barretts of Wimpole Street [Sidney Franklin] cs/c

1956

The Little Hut [Mark Robson] c

1956

Island in the Sun [Robert Rossen] cs/c; 2uc: John Wilcox

1957

I Accuse! [José Ferrer] cs/b&w

1957

Gideon's Day/Gideon of Scotland Yard [John Ford] b&w (USA version) & c (UK version); uncred cph: Charles Lawton Jr.

1958

Indiscreet [Stanley Donen] c

1958

The Inn of the Sixth Happiness [Mark Robson] cs/c

1958

Solomon and Sheba [King Vidor] str/c; 2uc: John von Kotze; Skeets Kelly took over for a few days for an ill F. Young

1959

The Wreck of the Mary Deare [Michael Anderson] cs/c; co-addph; ph: Joseph Ruttenberg

1959

Gorgo [Eugène Lourié] c; addph: Douglas Adamson; 2uc: Jock Bennett; spec pfx: Tom Howard

1960

Hand in Hand [Philip Leacock] b&w

1960

The Greengage Summer/Loss of Innocence [Lewis Gilbert] c

[Left] with dir David Lean - "Lawrence of Arabia"

[With glasses] - "Lawrence of Arabia"

1962

Lawrence of Arabia [David Lean] sp70/c; 2uc: Nicolas Roeg, Skeets Kelly & Peter Newbrook

1963

Lord Jim [Richard Brooks] sp70/c; 2uc: Skeets Kelly

1964

The 7th Dawn [Lewis Gilbert] c

1965

Doctor Zhivago [David Lean] p (35mm & 70bu)/c; 2uc: Desmond Dickinson, Manuel Berenguer & Nicolas Roeg

1965

Rotten to the Core/Rotten to the Corps [John Boulting] p/b&w; 2uc: Skeets Kelly

1966

The Deadly Affair [Sidney Lumet] c

1966

You Only Live Twice [Lewis Gilbert] p/c; 2uc: Bob Huke; uwph: Lamar Boren; aph: John Jordan; vfx ph: Martin Shorthall

1967

Sinful Davey [John Huston] p/c; cph: Ted Scaife

1968

Battle of Britain [Guy Hamilton] p/c; 2uc: Bob Huke; aph: Skeets Kelly & John Jordan

1969

Ryan's Daughter [David Lean] sp70/c; 2uc: Denys Coop & Bob Huke

1970

Nicholas and Alexandra [Franklin Schaffner] p (35mm & 70bu)/c; 2uc: Manuel Berenguer

1972

The Asphyx/Spirit of the Dead/The Horror of Death [Peter Newbrook] tao35/c

1972

Luther [Guy Green] c

1973

The Tamarind Seed [Blake Edwards] p/c; 2uc: James Allen

1975

The Blue Bird [George Cukor] p/c; cph: Jonas Gricius (filmed the first 10 weeks, but was replaced by FY; JG stayed on as 2uc)

1975

Permission to Kill/The Executioner [Cyril Frankel] c; 2uc: Sepp Riff

1978

Stevie [Robert Enders] c

1978

How to Score... A Movie [Robert Enders] c; mus doc/30m

1978

Bloodline/Blutspur [Terence Young] c; 2uc: Cesare Allione & Alexander Barbey

"Rough Cut" - photo Thys Ockersen Archive

1979

Rough Cut [Don Siegel & (uncred) Robert Ellis Miller] c

1982

Invitation to the Wedding [Joseph Brooks] p/c; aph: Peter Allwork

1982

Sword of the Valiant - The Legend of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight [Stephen Weeks] J-D-C Scope/c; cph: Peter Hurst


 TELEVISION

1960

Macbeth [George Schaefer] tvm; ep #177 'Hallmark Hall of Fame'-series; also released theatrically

1973

Love from A to Z [Mel Stuart] mus special/60m

1974

Great Expectations [Joseph Hardy] tvm; originally made as a musical, but all songs were cut; also released theatrically

1976

The Man in the Iron Mask [Mike Newell] tvm

1978

Ike [Boris Sagal (BS) & Melville Shavelson] 3-part miniseries; ph European scenes dir by BS; ph USA: Arch R. Dalzell; re-edited as 'Ike: The War Years' (2 parts)

1980

Richard's Things [Anthony Harvey] tvm

1980

Stainless Steel and the Star Spies [Anthony Simmons] pilot (live action + puppetry) for Thames TV; series was cancelled


 MISCELLANEOUS

1920

Saved from the Sea [W.P. Kellino] uncred c.asst (+ stunts); ph: ?

1922

Rob Roy [W.P. Kellino] uncred c.asst (+ stunts); ph: Basil Emmott & A. St. Aubyn Brown

1923

Fires of Fate/The Desert Sheik [Tom Terriss] uncred c.asst; ph: A. St. Aubyn Brown & H.W. Bishop

1926

The Triumph of the Rat [Graham Cutts] uncred c.asst; ph: Hal Young

1926

The Flag Lieutenant [Maurice Elvey] 2nd cam (for foreign negative); ph: William Shenton & Leslie Eveleigh

1927

The Somme [M.A. Wetherell] 2nd cam (for foreign negative); ph: Sydney Blythe

1927

Die Somme/Das Grab der Millionen [Heinz Paul] ?; ph: Sydney Blythe & Georg Bruckbauer; German-language version of 'The Somme' (?)

1928

The Triumph of the Scarlet Pimpernel/The Scarlet Daredevil [T. Hayes Hunter] uncred c.asst; ph: William Shenton